“A Home for All: Six Experiments in Social Housing” at Victoria and Albert Museum

The challenge of providing housing for all is one that has faced governments and architects for over a century. This display presents six innovative projects from the collections of the RIBA and the V&A, each demonstrating a unique experiment in social housing design, providing lessons for today.

 

Keeling House, Claredale Street, Bethnal Green, London: detail of base of cluster block © RIBA Collections

 

Keeling House / Denys Lasdun & Partners. Constructed 1954-59, London. Keeling House was an early experiment in ‘cluster block’ housing. This innovative form placed four 16 storey blocks around a free-standing services tower. The linked blocks were designed to balance the existing community of the street with a sense of seclusion. Privacy was achieved with short access balconies that serve only two flats and face each other at oblique angles. The shared central platforms provided the communal services such as laundry. (more…)

“The Future Starts Here” at the Victoria & Albert Museum

The colourful and narrative exhibition installation, by the architect Andrés Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation in Madrid, bring together ground-breaking technologies and designs currently in development in studios and laboratories around the world.

 

The Future Starts Here Installation View © Victoria and Albert Museum London

The Future Starts Here Installation View © Victoria and Albert Museum London

 

The V&A will explore the power of design in shaping the world of tomorrow in its major spring exhibition. From portraits of Chelsea Manning generated by her DNA, a chargeable shirt which can power a smartphone, objects printed by the world’s first zero gravity printer to a global seed bank to prevent loss of plant species in the event of a crisis, The Future Starts Here will bring together ground-breaking technologies and designs. (more…)

‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’ at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Featuring groundbreaking pieces by Alvar Aalto, Marcel Breuer and Charles and Ray Eames, alongside an incredible range of objects from planes to skateboards, this exhibition tells the story of how this often-overlooked material made the modern world.

 

Ice-skating shelters, designed by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

Ice-skating shelters by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

 

Light, strong and versatile, plywood is the surprising material celebrated in this world-first exhibition, ‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’. From cars to aeroplanes, furniture to architecture and hand-making to digital manufacture, this exhibition explores a frequently overlooked material that has helped shape the modern world, revealing how plywood has revolutionised design over the past 150 years.

The exhibition, hosted at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, comes together with many activities such as conferences, guided visits, talks and both adults and children’s workshops in order to take a closer a look at this material’s importance in the past and it’s possibilities for the future.  (more…)

“Engineering the World: Ove Arup and the Philosophy of Total Design” at Victoria and Albert Museum

The V&A celebrates the life and legacy of the 20th century’s greatest engineer, Ove Arup (1895-1988), with the first ever retrospective on the philosopher-engineer. Through his pioneering philosophy of Total Design, which for him meant to ‘join all the professions right from the start’, Ove Arup redefined the way architects, designers and engineers work together.

 

    Sydney Opera House under construction,     6 April 1966     7 MB     © Robert Baudin for Hornibrook Ltd. Courtesy Australian Air Photos

Sydney Opera House under construction, 6 April 1966 © Robert Baudin for Hornibrook Ltd. Courtesy Australian Air Photos

 

The exhibition, staged in cooperation with the global engineering and design consultancy Arup, reveals the untold stories behind some of the world’s most recognisable buildings, and shows that without Ove Arup and his firm, projects like the Sydney Opera House, Centre Pompidou in Paris and Crossrail would never have been built.

(more…)