“Dawson’s Heights: Hilltop Community” at the RIBA London

This display of 20 previously unseen photographs focuses on Dawson’s Heights in south London, designed by architect Kate Macintosh. It features images originally commissioned from former journalist and photographer Sam Lambert for the Architects’ Journal.

 

Dawson’s Heights. Photo by Robert Kirkman. 1973 © RIBA

 

Dawson’s Heights was a large-scale experiment in British social housing design completed by Kate Macintosh at the age of 27 on behalf of London borough of Southwark’s Architect’s Department. Described as one of the most remarkable housing developments in post-war Britain and much loved by its residents, it was nevertheless turned down for listing in 2012. (more…)

“A Home for All: Six Experiments in Social Housing” at Victoria and Albert Museum

The challenge of providing housing for all is one that has faced governments and architects for over a century. This display presents six innovative projects from the collections of the RIBA and the V&A, each demonstrating a unique experiment in social housing design, providing lessons for today.

 

Keeling House, Claredale Street, Bethnal Green, London: detail of base of cluster block © RIBA Collections

 

Keeling House / Denys Lasdun & Partners. Constructed 1954-59, London. Keeling House was an early experiment in ‘cluster block’ housing. This innovative form placed four 16 storey blocks around a free-standing services tower. The linked blocks were designed to balance the existing community of the street with a sense of seclusion. Privacy was achieved with short access balconies that serve only two flats and face each other at oblique angles. The shared central platforms provided the communal services such as laundry. (more…)

“Disappear Here” Sam Jacob’s exhibition on perspective at the RIBA

The exhibition explores the lineage of perspective across centuries and technologies. Connecting the disciplines of art, architecture and mathematics, the exhibition highlights the difference between reality and how we represent it through new architectural installations, an animated film, original drawings and rare books from RIBA’s Collections.

 

Hans Vredeman de Vries from his book Perspective 1604-5 © RIBA Collections

Hans Vredeman de Vries from his book Perspective 1604-5 © RIBA Collections

 

RIBA’s commissions are an opportunity for emerging and established practices and artists to work with RIBA curators to explore its historical collections through a contemporary lens. For this project, RIBA commissioned Sam Jacob Studio to transform the gallery into a mesmerising spatial environment on the theme of perspective. We provide an introduction to the exhibition and to the theme of perspective – where it originated and what the future may hold – interspersed with quotations from Sam Jacob, the principal of Sam Jacob Studio, taken from an accompanying essay. (more…)

“Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre” at Betts Project

Betts Project presents ‘Every Day Theatre’, an exhibition of Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu. This will be the artists’ first solo exhibition at the gallery, showing a series of new drawings and sculptural elements.

 

Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre © Courtesy Betts Project

Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre © Courtesy Betts Project

 

All objects shown in the gallery are related to everyday objects, from chimney to columns – constructive but also hiding technics. All objects are changing constantly the cubical form of the room. They are objects in space. Every day objects. (more…)

“Superstructures: The New Architecture 1960–1990” ​at Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts

2018 marks the 40th anniversary of the opening of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, the first public building designed by the world-renowned architect Norman Foster. In celebration, the Sainsbury Centre is launching a major exhibition to shine a light on developments in architecture from the 1960s to the 1990s.

 

SCVA-Superstructures-lead-phot-Ken-Kirkwood

SCVA-Superstructures-lead-photo Ken Kirkwood

 

SUPERSTRUCTURES tells the story of architecture’s fascination in the post-World War Two decades with new technology, lightweight structures, pioneering building techniques and innovative engineering solutions. Discover how the Sainsbury Centre was made and how earlier feats of engineering, such as The Crystal Palace, inspired Superstructure galleries, factories, offices, transport hubs and homes. (more…)

“The Baltic Material Assemblies” at Architectural Association

To mark the centenary of Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian independence, the Baltic Material Assemblies presents architecture of the Baltic states, exploring the material, infrastructural and cultural connections that have persevered despite the political borders and conflict lines that have been laid throughout the region.

 

"The Baltic Material Assemblies" © Jonathan-Lovekin

“The Baltic Material Assemblies” © Jonathan-Lovekin

 

‘The Baltic Material Assemblies’ presents architecture from the Baltic states, investigating the material, infrastructural and cultural connections that have persisted despite the political borders and conflict lines that changing regimes have aimed to introduce tothe region. The exhibition explores geologies, infrastructure and architecture which hold not just our past but our shared futures within them. (more…)

“Every House on Langland Road” at Architectural Association

Every House on Langland Road is an exploration of Netherfield, a unique housing project built in the new city of Milton Keynes in the early 1970s. The houses were designed before the collapse of the post war consensus in an optimistic spirit of public housing and social mobility.

 

"Every House on Langland Road" © AA  Simon Phipps and Darren Umney

“Every House on Langland Road” © AA Simon Phipps and Darren Umney

 

They were however built under the pressures of the three day week and within the budgetary constraints of a remote central government with shifting policies. The unique length, presence and history of the Netherfield streetscape provides a backdrop against which long standing and unresolved questions around the nature of housing, and social housing in particular, are brought into focus. An exhibition by Simon Phipps and Darren Umney. (more…)

Maggie’s Centre Barts: a lantern-like building by Steven Holl

Its façade – composed of panels rising in a single sloping wrapped band, actually references a sound: the staff of a musical score, with the random panels of colour that are embedded in it, apparently inspired bya Medieval ‘neume’ musical notation.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

Text description provided by the architects. The site in the centre of London is adjacent to the large courtyard of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. Founded in Smithfield in the 12th century, the hospital is the oldest in London and was founded at the same time as the St. Bartholomew the Great Church in 1123. Rahere founded the church and hospital “for the restoration of poor men.” Layers of history characterize this unique site, connecting deeply to the Medieval culture of London. While most all of the realized Maggie’s Centres have been horizontal buildings, the centre at St. Barts will be more vertical, sitting on the historically charged site. It will replace a pragmatic 1960s brick structure adjacent to a 17th century stone structure by James Gibbs, holding the “Great Hall” and the famous Hogarth staircase.


 

Project data

Project: Maggie’s Centre Barts, London
Client: Maggie Keswick Jencks Cancer Caring Centres Trust
Architect: Steven Holl Architects, New York . Steven Holl, FAIA (design architect, principal); Chris McVoy (senior partner-in-charge); Dominik Sigg (project architect, associate) Bell Ying Yi Cai, Gemma Gene, Martin Kropac, Christina Yessios, Assoc. AIA (project team)
Landscape Architect: Bradley Hole-Schoenaich
Associate Architect: JM Architects
Civil/Climate/Mechanical Engineer/Glass Consultant: Arup
Archaeology: Museum of London Archaeology
Size: 6,534 square feet

 


The building is envisioned as a “vessel within a vessel within a vessel.” The structure is a branching concrete frame, the inner layer is bamboo and the outer layer is matte white glass with coloured glass fragments recalling “neume notation” of the Medieval music of the 13th century. The word neume originates from the Greek pnevma, which means ‘vital force.’ It suggests a ‘breath of life’ that fills oneself with inspiration like a stream of air, the blowing of the wind. The outer glass layer is organized in horizontal bands like a musical staff while the concrete structure branches like the hand. The three-story centre has an open curved staircase integral to the concrete frame with open spaces vertically lined in bamboo.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

The glass facade geometry, like a musical “staff”, is in horizontal strips 90cm wide, which follow the geometry of the main stair along the north facade, while lifting up with clear glass facing the main square, marking the main front entrance. There is a second entry on the west opening to the extended garden of the adjacent church. The building tops out in a public roof garden open to a large room for yoga, Tai Chi, meetings etc.

 

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

The interior character of this building will be shaped by coloured light washing the floors and walls, changing by the time of day and season. Interior lighting will be organized to allow the coloured lenses together with the translucent white glass of the facade to present a new, joyful, glowing presence on this corner of the great square of St. Barts Hospital.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

ABOUT MAGGIE’S
Maggie’s provides free practical, emotional and social support for people with cancer and their families and friends. Built in the grounds of NHS hospitals, their Centres are warm and encouraging places, with professional staff on have to offer the support you need to find your way through cancer

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects


 

News source: Steven Holl
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“Adam Nathaniel Furman: The Roman Singularity” at Sir John Soane’s Museum

To coincide with the 15th London Design Festival the Sir John Soane’s Museum presents ‘The Roman Singularity’ by architectural designer Adam Nathaniel Furman, a city of 3D- printed models celebrating Rome as the pilgrimage site for the world’s imagination, alongside a new site-specific work created by Furman especially for the museum.

 

Adam Nathaniel Furman 'The Roman Singularity’ © Roberto Apa

Adam Nathaniel Furman ‘The Roman Singularity’ © Roberto Apa

 

Rome is a rich palimpsest of masterpieces, their remains, ruins, and fragments from innumerable historical periods since the Roman Republic, a veritable collection of epochs. But Rome is also a crucible of modernity, a repository for possible futures precisely because it is and has been the seat of so much power, and so many dreams, which together with the authority of its past almost force it to be perpetually radical about the present. (more…)

Look! Look! Look! pavilion by Studio Morison at Berrington Hall

Inspired by the decadent social lives of the Georgians, Heather and Ivan Morison have brought to life the first stage of this plan with their contemporary creation, ‘Look! Look! Look!’, which now features in the garden.

 

Look! Look! Look! / Studio Morison © Ivan Morison

Look! Look! Look! / Studio Morison © Ivan Morison

 

It is a project supported and partially funded by Trust New Art and the Arts Council England. Its form is inspired by the story of pineapples being imported and eaten during the eighteenth century as a statement of wealth and we’ve found evidence of them being grown in the garden at Berrington. The Georgians were also fond of popping up temporary pavilions made from wood and canvas or material for shelter whilst, entertaining, dining, reading or even for illicit meetings. (more…)