‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’ at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Featuring groundbreaking pieces by Alvar Aalto, Marcel Breuer and Charles and Ray Eames, alongside an incredible range of objects from planes to skateboards, this exhibition tells the story of how this often-overlooked material made the modern world.

 

Ice-skating shelters, designed by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

Ice-skating shelters by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

 

Light, strong and versatile, plywood is the surprising material celebrated in this world-first exhibition, ‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’. From cars to aeroplanes, furniture to architecture and hand-making to digital manufacture, this exhibition explores a frequently overlooked material that has helped shape the modern world, revealing how plywood has revolutionised design over the past 150 years.

The exhibition, hosted at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, comes together with many activities such as conferences, guided visits, talks and both adults and children’s workshops in order to take a closer a look at this material’s importance in the past and it’s possibilities for the future.  (more…)

“The Skywalk” tower in the mountains by Zdeněk Fránek Architects

“The Trail Among The Clouds” is a conceptual building which offers visitors an intense sensation of walking in the clouds and experience the space above the landscape. There are various attractions including a slide, nets and nests in the building for those who seek adventure or entertainment.

 

"The Skywalk" by Zdeněk Fránek Architects © Zdeněk Fránek Architects

“The Skywalk” by Zdeněk Fránek Architects © Zdeněk Fránek Architects

 

The entrance building is of a slightly oval shape much like a rowboat. Its construction is made of glued wooden beams set into a wooden grid supported by columns. The architectural approach was for the building to blend with it’s unique surrounding rather then to disturb it. This was the reason for using wood for the major part of the construction, and making the rails and mounts as subtle as possible. (more…)