“Dawson’s Heights: Hilltop Community” at the RIBA London

This display of 20 previously unseen photographs focuses on Dawson’s Heights in south London, designed by architect Kate Macintosh. It features images originally commissioned from former journalist and photographer Sam Lambert for the Architects’ Journal.

 

Dawson’s Heights. Photo by Robert Kirkman. 1973 © RIBA

 

Dawson’s Heights was a large-scale experiment in British social housing design completed by Kate Macintosh at the age of 27 on behalf of London borough of Southwark’s Architect’s Department. Described as one of the most remarkable housing developments in post-war Britain and much loved by its residents, it was nevertheless turned down for listing in 2012. (more…)

“Disappear Here” Sam Jacob’s exhibition on perspective at the RIBA

The exhibition explores the lineage of perspective across centuries and technologies. Connecting the disciplines of art, architecture and mathematics, the exhibition highlights the difference between reality and how we represent it through new architectural installations, an animated film, original drawings and rare books from RIBA’s Collections.

 

Hans Vredeman de Vries from his book Perspective 1604-5 © RIBA Collections

Hans Vredeman de Vries from his book Perspective 1604-5 © RIBA Collections

 

RIBA’s commissions are an opportunity for emerging and established practices and artists to work with RIBA curators to explore its historical collections through a contemporary lens. For this project, RIBA commissioned Sam Jacob Studio to transform the gallery into a mesmerising spatial environment on the theme of perspective. We provide an introduction to the exhibition and to the theme of perspective – where it originated and what the future may hold – interspersed with quotations from Sam Jacob, the principal of Sam Jacob Studio, taken from an accompanying essay. (more…)

‘When in Rome’ contemporary architects exhibition at RIBA London

RIBA London presents an exhibition on Rome – a first step towards the re-threading of an important tradition. The exhibition features the work of young contemporary architects whose career has been constantly looking back to the eternal city.

 

“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language © Point Supreme

“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language © Point Supreme

 

Rome is an off-centre metropolis, out of an orthodox perception of time, where every single past becomes present in a continuous state of monumental contemporariness.

Continuity and crisis share the same space: ancient brick walls are flanked by the anonymous ‘palazzine’ complex of the latest years and among these the everyday madness of the city: ceaseless traffic, tourists blinded by the scorching sun, the pink roman dust settling on monuments. And again: traditions, languages, researches, cultures and avant-gardes, compose a living postcard with an inimitable capacity for self-renewal.  (more…)

JSWD Architects present their work in ‘hautnah’, an exhibition at RIBA London

The Cologne-based firm JSWD Architekten present an itinerant exhibition on their most iconic works from the last 15 years. Focusing on details, façade and overall design composition, the exhibition will be showing at The Practice Space, RIBA, until August 27.

 

Maison de L'Histoire Europeénne, Brüssel © Foto: Christa Lachenmaier

Maison de L’Histoire Europeénne, Brüssel © Foto: Christa Lachenmaier

 

​The exhibition “hautnah” shows – in schematized images – details of completed projects by JSWD Architects. Individually tailored solutions are the result of a precise site response to functions and needs analysis – producing structures that offer a protective, intelligent and efficient “outer shell”, which will also serve to tell the developer’s story.  (more…)

“Liverpool(e): Mover, Shaker, Architectural Risk-Taker” at RIBA North

The exhibition displays a selection of drawings dating from the 1700’s to the 20th Century, revealing much about the process behind Liverpool’s development, from architectural competitions to speculative ideas that were not realised.

Competition design for Roman Catholic cathedral, Liverpool: elevation, by Denys Lasdun, 1959 ©RIBA Collections

Competition design for Roman Catholic cathedral, Liverpool: elevation, by Denys Lasdun, 1959 ©RIBA Collections

 

Liverpool(e): Mover, Shaker, Architectural Risk-Taker is the first exhibition at RIBA North, the new national architecture centre on the Liverpool Waterfront, which opens on 17 June to the public. Celebrating Liverpool’s architectural ambition and history, the show features over 30 original drawings, models and watercolours from the RIBA Collections for designs for Liverpool that were never realised.  (more…)

Brave Old World: Modernist public space design in London and São Paulo

Forming part of the London Festival of Architecture 2017, the exhibition looks at public space design between 1955 and 1975, during a crucial period for the development of two world cities, London and São Paulo, and their approach to architectural Modernism.

 

Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) by Eurico Prado Lopes and Luiz Benedito Castro Telles © RIBA

Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) by Eurico Prado Lopes and Luiz Benedito Castro Telles © RIBA

 

Brave Old World: Modernist public space design in London and São Paulo looks at public space design between c.1955 and c.1975, during a crucial period for the development of two world cities, London and São Paulo. Though located in very different cultures, the designers of the eight public spaces on show shared a common frame of reference, whatever their view of it: architectural Modernism. (more…)

“Social housing” book presentation and exhibition at RIBA London

RIBA presents an exhibition based on Paul Karakusevic and Abigail Bachelor’s new book, which explores the theme of new public housing from across Europe at a pivotal time for the sector.

 

Hillington Square, UK; by Mae Architects © Photo: Jack Hobhouse

Hillington Square, UK; by Mae Architects © Photo: Jack Hobhouse

 

To celebrate the launch of Paul Karakusevic and Abigail Bachelor’s new book on the theme of social housing, the RIBA is hosting an exhibition, ‘Social Housing – Definitions and Design Exemplars’ running from 18 April – 28 May 2017. Curated by Karakusevic Carson Architects it features projects by diverse practices from the book including BIQ/Hans van der Heijden, Lacaton & Vassal and LAN architecture and a discussion on Tuesday 16 May. (more…)

“Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square” at RIBA

Presented together for the first time, the exhibition offers a unique opportunity to draw comparisons between the design methods of two of the most highly recognised architects of the 20th century, and to trace the continuity in purpose and approach that unites two seemingly dissimilar architectural creations.

 

Proposed Mies van der Rohe-designed tower block for the Mansion House Square scheme. Image © John Donat / RIBA Collections

Proposed Mies van der Rohe-designed tower block for the Mansion House Square scheme. Image © John Donat / RIBA Collections

 

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) unveils a major new exhibition, Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square (8 March 2017 – 25 June 2017) offering a renewed examination of two iconic architectural schemes proposed for the same site in the City of London. Commissioned by architectural patron and developer Lord Peter Palumbo, Mies van der Rohe’s unrealised Mansion House Square project will be explored alongside its built successor, James Stirling Michael Wilford & Associates’ newly listed Number One Poultry. (more…)

“The Brutalist Playground” at Vitra Design Museum

The exhibition presents a new take on those Brutalist playgrounds, conceived as a hybrid somewhere between installation and walk-in sculpture for children and adults. The exhibition was commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in cooperation with the architecture collective Assemble (winner of the 2015 Turner Prize) and the artist Simon Terrill.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

 

The original playgrounds constructed in post-war Britain are mostly forgotten. Brutalism and its initial social agenda are stigmatized. The architectural style known as Brutalism emerged during the era of post-war reconstruction in Britain. In expressively shaped buildings constructed out of raw, heavy materials, it espoused an uncompromising formal language. All over the country, large-scale housing estates were built with distinctively designed playgrounds for children. Through the use of wood, brick, and especially concrete, the playgrounds were designed to fit in with the shapes and materials of their environments, demonstrating the principles of Brutalism on a small scale.


 

Practical information

The Brutalist Playground
January 14  –  April 16, 2017
Vitra Design Museum
Charles-Eames-Straße 2, Weil am Rhein
Germany

 


The exhibition reconstructs fragments from four Brutalist playgrounds: the »flying saucer« from the Churchill Gardens Estate, the slide tower from the Brownfield Estate, steps from the Brunel Estate (all in London), and a tunnel from the Park Hill Estate in Sheffield.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

 

For the project, commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), the architecture collective Assemble in cooperation with the artist Simon Terrill chose a selection of drawings and photographs from the RIBA collections. Part architectural installation, part projections of archive material, part playground, the exhibition brings a neglected aspect of architectural history into the gallery space.

 

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1978 © John Donat - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1978 © John Donat – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1956 © John Maltby - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1956 © John Maltby – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

 

»Risk« and »play« are the central themes of the installation. Jane Hall from Assemble says: »You would look at the photographs of these playgrounds and ask: How was someone supposed to play on that? It’s not prescribed, and that’s the big unknown about this exhibition – how are people going to inhabit the space?«

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

 

Architects and urban planners advocated these kinds of playgrounds as places where children could play as freely as possible. But by the early 1970s these concepts had been discarded and were being criticised by both architects and educators. As a result, many of the playgrounds are now lost. Consigned to the archives, they are at most a footnote to an idiosyncrasy in the history of post-war architecture.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

 

»The Brutalist Playground« enables a new, unbiased perspective on the original goals and designs of the architects of the time. In the exhibition children have the opportunity to »give free rein to their imagination«, just as the original architects intended. But adults, too, are invited to discover the play- scapes of the 1950s–1970s and the architectural ideas expressed in them.


 

News source: Vitra Design Museum
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“We Live in the Office” – A Commission by Giles Round at RIBA London

Round was invited to explore the RIBA Collections, and through extensive research has created an exhibition for the Architecture Gallery that focuses our attention on one of the most familiar and unavoidable architectural features of the city: the façade.

 

Chiat Day Offices, Venice, Los Angeles, 1991, by Bruggen, Coosje van (1942-2009) Gehry, Frank O. (1929-) and Oldenburg, Claes (1929-) © Oliver Perrott_RIBA Collections

Chiat Day Offices, Venice, Los Angeles, 1991, by Bruggen, Coosje van (1942-2009) Gehry, Frank O. (1929-) and Oldenburg, Claes (1929-) © Oliver Perrott_RIBA Collections

 

This autumn the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) presents a new commission by multi-disciplinary artist Giles Round. Inspired by the work of a wide-range of architects represented in the RIBA’s world-class architectural collections, Round explores the increasing tension between the static exterior and changing interior of the architecture around us.

He highlights the aesthetic qualities of facades in their original conception, and the subsequent contemporary use and reuse of these buildings. Round also explores the ways in which we currently ‘collect’ and preserve facades, creating an archive of buildings in real space and time. (more…)