“Save | Change the City” an unbuilt, alternative Brussels at CIVA Stichting

The exhibition shows a Brussels that used to exist, but is no longer there. A Brussels that somehow was proved possible to save. And a Brussels that could have been: a perfect fit in the CIVA’s new Unbuilt Brussels series, which shows a city that was thought up but never built.

 

Petit Château Quarter, 1976. Architects Jean-Pierre HOA, Philippe LEFEBVRE-BRANDES, Elie LEVY, Caroline MIEROP & Anne VAN LOO // La Cambre  Students (Didier ANGE& Brigitte BUYSSENS )

Petit Château Quarter, 1976. Architects Jean-Pierre HOA, Philippe LEFEBVRE-BRANDES, Elie LEVY, Caroline MIEROP & Anne VAN LOO // La Cambre Students (Didier ANGE& Brigitte BUYSSENS )

 

Brusselisation” is the key word behind the new exhibition at CIVA Stichting, “Save | Change the City“. The exhibition is part of a double-programme focusing on half a century of town planning in Brussels, under two unique perspectives. “Save | Change the City”  presents an overview of local residents’ initiatives in opposition to ‘Brusselisation’ and explores the alternatives that the two main neighbours’ associations proposed at the time in order to achieve a liveable city – one with respect for its citizens, its architecture, and its heritage.  (more…)

“Neighbourhood: where Alvaro meets Aldo” Portuguese Pavilion at Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

The exhibition, curated by architects Nuno Grande and Roberto Cremascoli in collaboration with the Direcção-Geral das Artes, focuses on Álvaro Siza Vieira’s remarkable work  in the field of social housing, covering projects from different cities.

 

Neighbourhood: where Alvaro meets Aldo © Nicolò Galeazzi

Neighbourhood: where Alvaro meets Aldo © Nicolò Galeazzi

 

This year’s edition of the Venice Architecture Biennale  (May 28 – November 27), under the heading “Reporting from the Front”, focuses on social concerns and urban transformations in the whole world. In response to the challenge posed by this year’s director Alejandro Aravena, Portugal has a “site-specific” pavilion , built in an urban setting that displays physical and social regeneration in the city of Venice, more specifically on the island of Giudecca: Campo di Mars. In fact, the idea of installing the Portuguese pavilion in situ triggered the completion of the regeneration project in Marte, proposed by architect Alvaro Siza. After the “occupation” of this site under construction, the exhibition will give rise to an architectural space for real people.

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