“Architecture Prototypes & Experiments” at The Aram Gallery

This edition of Prototypes and Experiments looks at the architectural process. Aram Gallery have asked a selection of practices to share how they use physical models as part of a design’s development. The exhibits will show a range of uses for models in practice – not just for presentation, but to explore ideas, evoke the feeling of a space, or arrive at a point of decision making.

 

PUP Architects, H-VAC antipavilion structural model

PUP Architects, H-VAC antipavilion structural model

 

The models on display will be a mix of massing studies, construction models and façade studies at a range of scales. The exhibition will also include other physical artefacts from the design process: colour tests, material palettes, 1:1 mock ups, and prototype elements. (more…)

“Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Barrels and The Mastaba 1958–2018” at Serpentine Galleries

Christo’s first large-scale public sculpture in the UK will float on The Serpentine lake in Hyde Park from 18 June to 23 September. Measuring 20m in height by 30m and 40m, the sculpture consists of 7,506 horizontally stacked barrels, specifically fabricated and painted in shades of red, white, blue and mauve.

 

Christo and Jeanne-Claude  The London Mastaba, Serpentine Lake, Hyde Park, 2016-18  Photo: Wolfgang Volz  © 2018 Christo

Christo and Jeanne-Claude The London Mastaba, Serpentine Lake, Hyde Park, 2016-18 Photo: Wolfgang Volz © 2018 Christo

 

The London Mastaba is Christo’s first outdoor, public work in the UK. The sculpture and exhibition offer an unprecedented opportunity for visitors to experience Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s work. Born on the same day in 1935 in Gabrovo, Bulgaria and Casablanca, Morocco respectively, Christo and his late wife Jeanne-Claude, who died in 2009, began their collaboration in 1961 and their many celebrated public projects include Wrapped Coast, Sydney, Australia (1968-69), Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin (1971-1995); The Gates, Central Park, New York City (1979-2005); and more recently The Floating Piers on Italy’s Lake Iseo (2014-2016). (more…)

Discover the Serpentine Pavilion 2018, designed by Frida Escobedo

Frida Escobedo, an architect celebrated for dynamic projects that reactivate urban space, has designed the Serpentine Pavilion 2018. Harnessing a subtle interplay of light, water and geometry, her atmospheric courtyard design draws on both the domestic architecture of Mexico and British materials and history, specifically the Prime Meridian line at London’s Royal Observatory in Greenwich.

 

Serpentine Pavilion 2018, designed by Frida Escobedo, Serpentine Gallery, London (15 June – 7 October 2018) © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Photography © 2018 Iwan Baan

Serpentine Pavilion 2018, designed by Frida Escobedo, Serpentine Gallery, London (15 June – 7 October 2018) © Frida Escobedo, Taller de Arquitectura, Photography © 2018 Iwan Baan

 

Escobedo (b. 1979, Mexico City) is the 18th and youngest architect yet to accept the invitation to designa temporary Pavilion on the Serpentine Gallery lawn in Kensington Gardens. This pioneering commission, which began in 2000 with Zaha Hadid, has presented the first UK structures of some of the biggest na mes in international architecture. In recent years, it has grown into a hotly anticipated showcase for emerging talent, from Sou Fujimoto of Japan to selgascano of Spain and Bjarke lngels of Denmark, whose 2016 Pavilion was the most visited architectural and design exhibition in the world. Serpentine Galleries Artistic Director Hans Ulrich Obrist and CEO Yana Peel selected this year’s architect, with advisors David Adjaye and Richard Rogers. The Serpentine Pavilion 2018 is sponsored by Goldman Sachs in its fourth year of support. (more…)

“The Baltic Material Assemblies” at Architectural Association

To mark the centenary of Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian independence, the Baltic Material Assemblies presents architecture of the Baltic states, exploring the material, infrastructural and cultural connections that have persevered despite the political borders and conflict lines that have been laid throughout the region.

 

"The Baltic Material Assemblies" © Jonathan-Lovekin

“The Baltic Material Assemblies” © Jonathan-Lovekin

 

‘The Baltic Material Assemblies’ presents architecture from the Baltic states, investigating the material, infrastructural and cultural connections that have persisted despite the political borders and conflict lines that changing regimes have aimed to introduce tothe region. The exhibition explores geologies, infrastructure and architecture which hold not just our past but our shared futures within them. (more…)

“Mudun. Urban Cultures in Transit” at Architectural Association

The exhibition Mudun, Urban Cultures in Transit presents the varying dynamics and atmospheres of urban areas in the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region through ten years of research and documentation by the Dubai-based magazine, Brownbook. These distinct mudun (‘cities’ in Arabic) include Ankara, Baghdad, Sharjah and Tangier, as well as the diaspora in Altach, Nashville, Santiago and Södertälje.

 

Rashid Karami International Fair Tripoli by Oscar Niemeyer

Rashid Karami International Fair Tripoli by Oscar Niemeyer

 

As a whole, this region’s rapid urbanisation has resulted in heterogenous city landscapes that oscillate between deeply rooted connections to tradition and an openness to globalisation and technological progress. Because of this tension the cities of the MENA region provide the grounds for a number of paradoxes – for individual opportunity and development, conflicts and injustice, for both the establishment and for subcultures, as well as for debates about identity and participation in the urban habitat.

(more…)

Maggie’s Centre Barts: a lantern-like building by Steven Holl

Its façade – composed of panels rising in a single sloping wrapped band, actually references a sound: the staff of a musical score, with the random panels of colour that are embedded in it, apparently inspired bya Medieval ‘neume’ musical notation.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

Text description provided by the architects. The site in the centre of London is adjacent to the large courtyard of St. Bartholomew’s Hospital. Founded in Smithfield in the 12th century, the hospital is the oldest in London and was founded at the same time as the St. Bartholomew the Great Church in 1123. Rahere founded the church and hospital “for the restoration of poor men.” Layers of history characterize this unique site, connecting deeply to the Medieval culture of London. While most all of the realized Maggie’s Centres have been horizontal buildings, the centre at St. Barts will be more vertical, sitting on the historically charged site. It will replace a pragmatic 1960s brick structure adjacent to a 17th century stone structure by James Gibbs, holding the “Great Hall” and the famous Hogarth staircase.


 

Project data

Project: Maggie’s Centre Barts, London
Client: Maggie Keswick Jencks Cancer Caring Centres Trust
Architect: Steven Holl Architects, New York . Steven Holl, FAIA (design architect, principal); Chris McVoy (senior partner-in-charge); Dominik Sigg (project architect, associate) Bell Ying Yi Cai, Gemma Gene, Martin Kropac, Christina Yessios, Assoc. AIA (project team)
Landscape Architect: Bradley Hole-Schoenaich
Associate Architect: JM Architects
Civil/Climate/Mechanical Engineer/Glass Consultant: Arup
Archaeology: Museum of London Archaeology
Size: 6,534 square feet

 


The building is envisioned as a “vessel within a vessel within a vessel.” The structure is a branching concrete frame, the inner layer is bamboo and the outer layer is matte white glass with coloured glass fragments recalling “neume notation” of the Medieval music of the 13th century. The word neume originates from the Greek pnevma, which means ‘vital force.’ It suggests a ‘breath of life’ that fills oneself with inspiration like a stream of air, the blowing of the wind. The outer glass layer is organized in horizontal bands like a musical staff while the concrete structure branches like the hand. The three-story centre has an open curved staircase integral to the concrete frame with open spaces vertically lined in bamboo.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

The glass facade geometry, like a musical “staff”, is in horizontal strips 90cm wide, which follow the geometry of the main stair along the north facade, while lifting up with clear glass facing the main square, marking the main front entrance. There is a second entry on the west opening to the extended garden of the adjacent church. The building tops out in a public roof garden open to a large room for yoga, Tai Chi, meetings etc.

 

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

The interior character of this building will be shaped by coloured light washing the floors and walls, changing by the time of day and season. Interior lighting will be organized to allow the coloured lenses together with the translucent white glass of the facade to present a new, joyful, glowing presence on this corner of the great square of St. Barts Hospital.

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Iwan Baan

 

ABOUT MAGGIE’S
Maggie’s provides free practical, emotional and social support for people with cancer and their families and friends. Built in the grounds of NHS hospitals, their Centres are warm and encouraging places, with professional staff on have to offer the support you need to find your way through cancer

 

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie's Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects

Maggie’s Centre Barts / Steven Holl Architects © Steven Holl Architects


 

News source: Steven Holl
Subscribe here to get weekly updates about architecture events and exhibitions.

‘When in Rome’ contemporary architects exhibition at RIBA London

RIBA London presents an exhibition on Rome – a first step towards the re-threading of an important tradition. The exhibition features the work of young contemporary architects whose career has been constantly looking back to the eternal city.

 

“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language © Point Supreme

“Re-Constructivist Architecture” Exhibition Explores the Lost Art of Architectural Language © Point Supreme

 

Rome is an off-centre metropolis, out of an orthodox perception of time, where every single past becomes present in a continuous state of monumental contemporariness.

Continuity and crisis share the same space: ancient brick walls are flanked by the anonymous ‘palazzine’ complex of the latest years and among these the everyday madness of the city: ceaseless traffic, tourists blinded by the scorching sun, the pink roman dust settling on monuments. And again: traditions, languages, researches, cultures and avant-gardes, compose a living postcard with an inimitable capacity for self-renewal.  (more…)

‘London Design Festival’ celebrates its 15th anniversary from 16 to 24 September

For nine days in September, London provides the stage for thousands of individual designers and artists, companies and organisations to present their latest works. The Festival invites visitors to take a closer look at their diverse output, from the commercial to the conceptual, the practical to the improbable.

 

Reflection Room by Flynn Talbot at Victoria and Albert Museum © London Design Festival

Reflection Room by Flynn Talbot at Victoria and Albert Museum © London Design Festival

 

London Design Festival celebrates and promotes London as the design capital of the world. Now in its fifteenth year, the Festival will be returning to venues and institutions across the city between the 16-24 September 2017. A major feature of the Festival is an ambitious programme of over 450 projects and events, offering Londoners and visitors to the city an opportunity to experience world-class, innovative, and challenging design across the capital.

Learn all about the different Design Districts here.  (more…)

‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’ at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London

Featuring groundbreaking pieces by Alvar Aalto, Marcel Breuer and Charles and Ray Eames, alongside an incredible range of objects from planes to skateboards, this exhibition tells the story of how this often-overlooked material made the modern world.

 

Ice-skating shelters, designed by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

Ice-skating shelters by Patkau Architects, Vancouver, 2011, built by Isokon Plus, London, 2017. © Patkau Architects

 

Light, strong and versatile, plywood is the surprising material celebrated in this world-first exhibition, ‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’. From cars to aeroplanes, furniture to architecture and hand-making to digital manufacture, this exhibition explores a frequently overlooked material that has helped shape the modern world, revealing how plywood has revolutionised design over the past 150 years.

The exhibition, hosted at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, comes together with many activities such as conferences, guided visits, talks and both adults and children’s workshops in order to take a closer a look at this material’s importance in the past and it’s possibilities for the future.  (more…)

“Social housing” book presentation and exhibition at RIBA London

RIBA presents an exhibition based on Paul Karakusevic and Abigail Bachelor’s new book, which explores the theme of new public housing from across Europe at a pivotal time for the sector.

 

Hillington Square, UK; by Mae Architects © Photo: Jack Hobhouse

Hillington Square, UK; by Mae Architects © Photo: Jack Hobhouse

 

To celebrate the launch of Paul Karakusevic and Abigail Bachelor’s new book on the theme of social housing, the RIBA is hosting an exhibition, ‘Social Housing – Definitions and Design Exemplars’ running from 18 April – 28 May 2017. Curated by Karakusevic Carson Architects it features projects by diverse practices from the book including BIQ/Hans van der Heijden, Lacaton & Vassal and LAN architecture and a discussion on Tuesday 16 May. (more…)