“Gordon Matta-Clark. Anarchitect” at Jeu de Paume

Featuring one hundred artworks by Gordon Matta-Clark, the exhibition “Anarchitect” explores the importance of Matta-Clark’s practice towards a rethinking of architecture after modernism. Embracing a diversity of media that include photography, film and printmaking, the exhibition features a number of works related to contemporary urban culture that further contextualize Gordon Matta-Clark’s compelling critique of architecture.

 

Conical Intersect 1975 Gordon Matta-Clark Courtesy The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark et David Zwirner, New York / Londres / Hong Kong. © 2018 The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / ADAGP, Paris

Conical Intersect, 1975, Gordon Matta-Clark, Courtesy The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark et David Zwirner, New York / Londres / Hong Kong. © 2018 The Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark / ADAGP, Paris

 

Soon after completing his studies at Cornell University School of Architecture (1962-1968), Matta-Clark moved to New York and started developing a series of artworks in situ that seemed to perform an anatomy of sorts on the very body of the urban landscape by literally cutting structures apart and exhibiting the remnants as demonstration. (more…)

“Splitting, cutting, writing, drawing, eating… Gordon Matta-Clark” exhibition at Culturgest Lisboa

The exhibition  surveys the constructive and destructive verbs that defined his relation to art and architecture, featuring correspondence, drawings, photographs, notebooks, and films related to the artist’s key projects, drawn from the archive of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, in Montréal.  

Conical Intersect, 1975. © Gordon Matta-Clark y David Zwirner, New York

Conical Intersect, 1975. © Gordon Matta-Clark y David Zwirner, New York

 

Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) is one of the most influential artists of the 1970s, whose work has continued to be a noted influence of both architects and visual artists since. Along with his major building cuts from 1973 to 1978, in which laboriously cut holes into floors of abandoned or disused buildings, including A W-Hole House, Conical Intersect, Day’s End, and Splitting (1974), the exhibition also explores his interest in metabolic and cooking processes, including his restaurant Food (1971); his play with language and the syntax of voids, gaps, and abandoned spaces;  and the use of drawing as a mode of thinking through space.The exhibition will focus on these social and creative aspects of Matta-Clark´s conception of architecture, or as he put it, “making space without building it”. (more…)

“Splitting, cutting, writing, drawing, eating… Gordon Matta-Clark” exhibition at Serralves Museum

The exhibition  surveys the constructive and destructive verbs that defined his relation to art and architecture, featuring correspondence, drawings, photographs, notebooks, and films related to the artist’s key projects, drawn from the archive of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, in Montréal.  

 

Conical Intersect, 1975. © Gordon Matta-Clark y David Zwirner, New York

 

Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) is one of the most influential artists of the 1970s, whose work has continued to be a noted influence of both architects and visual artists since. Along with his major building cuts from 1973 to 1978, in which laboriously cut holes into floors of abandoned or disused buildings, including A W-Hole House, Conical Intersect, Day’s End, and Splitting (1974), the exhibition also explores his interest in metabolic and cooking processes, including his restaurant Food (1971); his play with language and the syntax of voids, gaps, and abandoned spaces;  and the use of drawing as a mode of thinking through space.The exhibition will focus on these social and creative aspects of Matta-Clark´s conception of architecture, or as he put it, “making space without building it,”. (more…)

“Lost in the city” Urban life in the IVAM Collection

The central idea of this exhibition is to display a large number of works that will allow us to see the manifold visions, the different spaces and the large number of human lives that made up city life in the last century through the works in the collection of the IVAM.

 

Paul Citroën. Metropolis, ca. 1923 © IVAM

Paul Citroën. Metropolis, ca. 1923 © IVAM

 

The exhibition brings together about 300 works belonging to the collection of the IVAM, recently enriched with funds ceded in deposit by Cal Cego and Juan Redón. An important selection of paintings, sculptures, photographs and videos by artists like Paul Citroën, Jan Kamman, Lee Friedlander or César Domela, Walker Evans, Horacio Coppola or Gabriel Cualladó, to Sigmar Polke, Gregory Crewdson, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Miquel Navarro, Bernd and Hilla Becher or Gordon Matta Clark. (more…)