“Unbuilt Mackintosh” model exhibition at The Lighthouse

The models on show represent a selection of architectural designs by Mackintosh —they were competition entries run by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Glasgow International Exhibition at Kelvingrove Park respectively. Although they received notable media attention, none of these plans were selected as winning designs.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

The wonderful Unbuilt Mackintosh Models are currently resident in the Review Gallery at  The Lighthouse, Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture. This is the first time in over a year all models have been displayed together! See them here until 31 March 2017.


 

Practical information

“Unbuilt Mackintosh”
February 7 -March 31, 2017
The Lighthouse
11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow
Scotland

 


The models on show represent a selection of architectural designs by Mackintosh himself. They were competition entries run by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Glasgow International Exhibition at Kelvingrove Park respectively. Although they received notable media attention, none of these plans were selected as winning designs.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

In Glasgow you can visit The House for an Art Lover, a building designed by Mackintosh with his wife, Margaret McDonald in 1901, yet not built until 1989.Mackintosh approached his architectural drawings like an artist would a canvas. He used watercolour to suggest colour-ways, as well as using pen and ink to note the dimensions, plans and elevations of the building. While we cannot be one-hundred percent sure of what these less than precise drawings illustrated, there are enough existing buildings by Mackintosh to give a good indication. The two-dimensional drawings offer the modern designer or architect a starting point to respond to, but many of the decisions around materials, proportions, and finish are still open to interpretation.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

These models have been interpreted and built by Cemal Ozturk of Ozturk Modelmakers in Glasgow. Their precise dimensions meticulously drawn from what drawings and documentations were available. The choice of building materials for the models have been chosen, not so much for their ability to realistically interpret the proposed building, but for their precision and ability to highlight the detailing and style of the designs. These buildings are thoroughly modern interpretations of the originals and offer visitors new ways of looking and understanding the prolific work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

 

Three-quarters view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright

Three-quarters view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright

Bird’s-eye view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Bird’s-eye view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Look through the roof of the trainshed of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Look through the roof of the trainshed of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

The acquisition has been made possible by the generous support of The Mackintosh Heritage Trust and Creative Scotland.


 

 

News source and text: The Lighthouse
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Architecture collective Assemble wins Turner Prize 2015

The jury’s decision was revealed on December 7, awarding a body of work that often deploys unconventional means, is self-initiated, self-made or self-organised, subverting typical hierarchies and procedures surrounding the realisation of architectural spaces.

 

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

 

The Turner Prize 2015 has been awarded to Assemble, the architecture collective. The results of the 2015 edition of the Prize were announced on the 7th of December at Tramway, Glasgow, in partnership with Tate. The £25,000 prize was presented by artist, musician and songwriter Kim Gordon during a live broadcast on Channel 4.

The jury applauded the strength of all the nominated artists’ work: Janice Kerbel, Bonnie Camplin, Nicole Wermers and Assemble, who were awarded the prize for working in tandem with communities to realise a ground-up approach to regeneration, city planning and development in opposition to corporate gentrification. (more…)