Architektur Galerie Berlin presents STEAL SCHINKEL, a students’ approach to Schinkel’s Bauakademie

Demolished in 1962, Schinkel’s Bauakademie in Berlin is now scheduled to be rebuilt on a budget of 62 million euros. Students from Studio EAST at EPFL Lausanne have undertaken a research and design programme to reflect on the possibilities of the building’s inminent reconstruction.

 

Students' models at 'STEAL SCHINKEL' © Architektur Galerie Berlin

Students’ models at ‘STEAL SCHINKEL’ © Architektur Galerie Berlin

 

Following the budgeting of 62 million euros in March 2017  for the reconstruction of Schinkel’s Bauakademie in Berlin, German architects are in the need of re-formulating and reflecting over the historical original building and its meaning today.

How and how much will we keep the memory of Schinkel’s Bauakademie? How do we want this place to behave in its contemporary urban landscape? How, or do we, want to update the functional program of the building for the future? Is it possible to find a Schinkelian sense and expression of designing buildings today?

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“Form Follows Fiction” work by huggenbergerfries at Architektur Galerie Berlin

Taking this motto as the title of their exhibition, huggenbergerfries Architekten present three projects of very different scale to represent their creative approach: Limmat Tower (Dietikon, 2016), Heerbrugg cantonal school (2014), and the newly completed Solaris residential building (Zurich, 2017).

 

huggenbergerfries Architekten. Tramwartehalle Paradeplatz, Zürich, 2003 © Beat Bühler

huggenbergerfries Architekten. Tramwartehalle Paradeplatz, Zürich, 2003 © Beat Bühler

 

“We don’t build things that could be anywhere other than where they are,” say the Zurich-based architects about their work. This is explained by the approach they take in developing an architectural concept, which is based on research into the local context. The form, expression, and structure of each of their projects emerge from both the specifics of the location and the program, and are accordingly diverse. Context and architecture thereby merge unconditionally to follow a narrative that yields a multifaceted web of relationships reflecting the notion of “form follows fiction.”

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Last days for “Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920 – 1990” at Tschoban Foundation

The exhibition features Berlin as seen throught the eyes of the most successful architects of the XXth Century: from actually built projects by Álvaro Siza and OMA to utopian visions by Bernard Tschumi, Hans Scharoun, Mies Van der Rohe and many others.

 

OMA, Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Matthias Sauerbruch, Elia Zenghelis, 1980 – 1990 House at Checkpoint Charlie Competition, building complex, isometry Watercolour on Xerox copy 82 x 166 cm © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © OMA

OMA, Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Matthias Sauerbruch, Elia Zenghelis (1980 – 1990)  House at Checkpoint Charlie. Competition, building complex, isometry  © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © OMA

 

Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920–1990 shows an exciting selection of important moments in Berlin’s urban and architectural development, illustrated by hand-drawn designs by Hans Scharoun, Hans Poelzig, Frei Otto, Gottfried Böhm, Zaha Hadid, Álvaro Siza Vieira and other renowned architects. A selection: the exhibition should therefore by no means be seen as a complete chronological documentation of the capital’s architecture during this period. It is rather a presentation of the variety of ideas and visions for Berlin, a stimulus to comparison of the drawn and the actually built architecture, and a highlighting of the high artistic quality of the exhibited works. (more…)

“Grenzen / Borders” European Architectural Photography Prize 2017 at DAM

The European Architectural Photography Prize architekturbild is awarded every two years, and 2017 marks the 12th time since 1995. As always, photographers from all over the world were invited to submit in a series of four photographs their very personal interpretation of a specific topic.

 

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 1 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 1 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

 

With “Grenzen / Borders” we all immediately recall images from the summer of 2015 of the flow of refugees in front of hastily erected barbed-wire borders. And in Germany we inevitably think of the lethal border that until 1989 cut through the country. As the 2017 competition brief states, borders are physically present and clearly legible or subtly noticeable, are perceived as protection or deterrent. The works submitted take this up and in extremely different ways tell of enclosure and exclusion.


 

Practical information

“Grenzen / Borders” European Architectural Photography Prize 2017
May 6 – August 6, 2017
Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)
Schaumainkai 43, Frankfurt am Main
Germany

 


With its specific provisions, the competition aimed from the outset to promote an artistic, photographic exploration of the built environment. A series of four images enables stories to be told; the specific topic gives direction, but also always allows great leeway. What started out as an initiative of db deutsche bauzeitung has since 2003 been continued, with a great deal of voluntary work, by architekturbild e.v., which back then had recently been founded.

 

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 3 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 3 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 4 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 4 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

 

The association is responsible for the competition, the touring exhibition, and the catalog. 2008 saw the beginning of the partnership with Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM), which subsequently took over the initial presentation of the prize-winning competition entries and became the venue for the award ceremony. The cooperation agreement with Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) also included the handing over of the competition archive, which is now part of the Frankfurt institute’s collection. In 2016 the Bundesstiftung Baukultur became the third partner.

 

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 2 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

Andreas Gehrke: ARRIVAL \ 2 © Photo: Andreas Gehrke \ architekturbild

 

To date the vast majority of entries come from German-speaking countries, where the competition originated. Photographers from ten countries including Japan, Canada, and the USA took part in the 2017 competition. 133 series of images were submitted. This was less than in previous years, but the quality was consistently high.

 

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 1 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 1 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 2 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 2 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

 

Ultimately, 28 series were honored. In 2017 the jury, as always made up of members from a wide range of professions and nations, was chaired by Celina Lunsford, Artistic Director of Fotografie Forum Frankfurt. Alongside the photographic quality it particularly took into consideration the serial link between the images submitted as well as creativity with regard to the handling of the topic, whether it was interpreted in an experimental, narrative, documentary, strict, or surprising manner.

 

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 3 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 3 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 4 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

Matthias Jung: REVIER \ 4 © Photo: Matthias Jung \ architekturbild

 

1st prize went to the Berlin photographer Andreas Gehrke. His series entitled “Arrival” won the jury over with its unusual visualization of one of the major problems of our time. By taking a close look at the accommodation allocated to refugees, he succeeds in revealing the alienation of the people and the impact of exclusion and homelessness.

 

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 1 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 1 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 2 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 2 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

 

Three 2nd prizes were awarded in 2017. The series “Revier” by Matthias Jung shows us boarded-up façades, which to the viewer look almost surreal. Exclusion, here too; there is no way back for the former inhabitants. The deserted ghost town will soon succumb to surface mining. In his work entitled “Stone Record”, Daniel Poller documents conversion, demolition, and new builds in a totally different way.

 

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 3 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 3 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 4 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

Daniel Poller: STONE RECORD \ 4 © Photo: Daniel Poller \ architekturbild

 

Contemporary structures are encroaching on historical architecture such that only façades remain. What is old becomes a decorative backdrop for a city that can do little to counter the laws of the real-estate market. Die im Dunklen is the title Wilhelm Schünemann gave his entry.

 

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

 

Reflective windows and curtains prevent a view inside the offices of corporations that have opened close to the Bundestag, the German parliament, where they quietly go about their lobbying. Alexander Beck, Martin Dziuba, Philippe Grollier, Wolfram Janzer, and Sally-AnnNorman were also honored.

 

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild

Wilhelm Schünemann: DIE IM DUNKELN \ 1 © Photo: Wilhelm Schünemann \ architekturbild


 

News source and text: DAM
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“Impressionism” Jacques Ferrier at Architektur Galerie Berlin

The exhibition at Architektur Galerie Berlin includes an optical installation recalling the façade of the Metropole Rouen-Normandie,
a homage of architect Jacques Ferrier to the work by Impressionist painter Claude Monet in Rouen.

 

Jacques Ferrier Architecture, Impressionism © Jacques Ferrier Architecture

Jacques Ferrier Architecture, Impressionism © Jacques Ferrier Architecture

 

Jacques Ferrier has developed a highly individual approach to architecture, rejecting the strictly formalist approach of the Modernists and instead embracing technology to improve relationship between people and their environment. Central to Ferrier’s work is the idea of the sensual city – a desire that all buildings should respond and contribute to the sensory experiences that make us human. In 2010 Jacques Ferrier and Pauline Marchetti founded Sensual City Studio, a research and creative laboratory dedicated to new proposals for a humanist and pleasurable metropolitan life. (more…)

“Frederick Kiesler: Architect, Artist, Visionary” at Martin-Gropius-Bau Berlin

Martin-Gropius-Bau is devoting an exhibition to the universal artist Frederick Kiesler, whose complex oeuvre is presented in all its facets for the first time in Germany. Central projects, important artistic friendships and collective works illustrate his importance in 20th-century architecture and art history and map out his environment.

 

 Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema, Screen-o-Scope, New York 1929 Photo: Ruth Bernhard, reproduced with permission of the Ruth Bernhard Archive, Princeton University Art Museum © Trustees of Princeton University

Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema, Screen-o-Scope, New York 1929. Photo: Ruth Bernhard, reproduced with permission of the Ruth Bernhard, Archive, Princeton University Art Museum © Trustees of Princeton University

 

Frederick Kiesler, born 1890 in Czernowitz (Chernivtsi), died 1965 in New York, was an Austro-American architect, stage designer, designer, artist and theoretician. His artistic approach blurring boundaries between individual artistic genres, his concept of an endlessly flowing space and his holistic theory of design Correalism belong to the greatest visions of the 20th century and enjoy undiminished topicality. Over and above this, Kiesler was a central figure in the network of New York’s aesthetic community, and his circle of friends reads like a Who-is-Who of the avant-garde. (more…)

Elytra Filament Pavilion, an outdoor installation from the exhibition “Hello, Robot”

The bionic baldachin is an impressive example of the growing influence of robotics on architecture. Its individual modules were defined by an algorithm and then produced with the help of an industrial robot, realised by a team from the University of Stuttgart.

 

Installation view Vitra Campus »Elytra Filament Pavilion« 2017 © Vitra Design Museum, Photo: Julien Lanoo

Installation view, Vitra Campus »Elytra Filament Pavilion« 2017 © Vitra Design Museum, Photo:
Julien Lanoo

 

With the exhibition »Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine«, the Vitra Design Museum presents a major exhibition that examines the current boom in robotics. It shows the variety of forms that robotics takes today and at the same time broadens our awareness of the associated ethical, social, and political issues. Outside the museum, the »Elytra Filament Pavilion« complements this exhibition. The bionic baldachin is an impressive example of the growing influence of robotics on architecture. Its individual modules were defined by an algorithm and then produced with the help of an industrial robot, realised by a team from the University of Stuttgart. After its premiere at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, it is now on view on the Vitra Campus. (more…)

Bauhaus‐Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung presents “Bauhaus in Motion”

The range of exhibited pieces encompasses works from classes at the Bauhaus – such as motion studies from the preliminary course – as well as paintings, photographs, architectural drafts, furniture, ceramics, metalwork and works on paper.

 

T. Lux Feininger, Physical Education at the Bauhaus: women’s gymnastic exercises on the roof of the Bauhaus, 1930 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin Copyright: Estate of T. Lux Feininger

T. Lux Feininger, Physical Education at the Bauhaus: women’s gymnastic exercises on the roof of the Bauhaus, 1930 Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin Copyright: Estate of T. Lux Feininger

 

From 1 March 2017 to 8 January 2018 the BauhausAArchiv / Museum für Gestaltung is showing “Bauhaus in Motion”. This special exhibition presents the connection between the Bauhaus and movement on various levels: the theme of motion can be found in works by famous Bauhaus teachers, such as Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Oskar Schlemmer and László Moholy-Nagy, as well as in numerous student works. (more…)

“Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country” at DAM Frankfurt

The exhibition, which DAM created and curated for the German Pavilion at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition 2016 – La Biennale di Venezia, will be presented on two floors at DAM, and feature updated and expanded subject matter, as well as documentation and a review of the German Pavilion in Venice.

 

Sri-Kamadchi-Ampal Temple, Hamm in Nordrhein-Westfalen Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

Sri-Kamadchi-Ampal Temple, Hamm in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

 

The exhibition responds to the fact that in 2015 the German borders were left open for around 900 000 refugees, and prompts reflection about Germany as an open immigration country. (more…)

“Expressionism and New Objectivity” the discovery and restoration of House Buchthal in Berlin

The exhibition presents the history of House Buchthal in Berlin-Westend in pictures, plans, and archival documents. In its original form, the home built in 1922/23 was one of the few examples of Expressionist villa architecture in Berlin.

 

House Buchthal in Berlin © Aedes Architekturforum

House Buchthal in Berlin © Aedes Architekturforum

 

Responsible for this built manifesto of the avant-garde was none other than the brothers Hans and Wassili Luckhardt – who later became famous for their white houses at Rupenhorn – in collaboration with the architect Franz Hoffmann. And they pulled all the stops, with angular, crystalline spaces, strong, contrasting colors, interiors by expressionist artists such as Oswald Herzog and Moriz Melzer, and a garden unlike any other in Berlin. Flowerbeds pointed like arrows toward the house; the lawn was sown in the shape of a maple leaf. The clients and residents of the building were the art-loving Jewish couple, Eugene and Thea Buchthal. Their art collection adorned the walls, and included works by Lyonel Feininger, Wassily Kandinsky, Emil Nolde, and many others. But just a few years later, the family with their three children had enough of living in a work of art. (more…)