“Denise Scott Brown: Wayward Eye” photography of the 1950s and 1960s at Betts Project

Betts Project is pleased to announce ‘Wayward Eye’ an exhibition of photography of the 1950s and 1960s by legendary architect-planner and theorist Denise Scott Brown. This will be Scott Brown’s first solo exhibition in the UK. ‘I’m not a photographer. I shoot for architecture — if there’s art here it’s a byproduct. Yet the images stand alone. Judge what you see.’

 

Pico Boulevard, Santa Monica, 1966. © Denise Scott Brown

Pico Boulevard, Santa Monica, 1966. © Denise Scott Brown

 

In 1956, Robert Scott Brown and I photographed architectural set pieces of Venice as records to return to while practicing in Africa. But in the process, more than architecture crept into our photographs. In 1965, after ten years of urbanism, my foci were automobile cities of the American Southwest, social change, multiculturalism, action, everyday architecture, “messy vitality,” iconography, and Pop Art. (more…)

“Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre” at Betts Project

Betts Project presents ‘Every Day Theatre’, an exhibition of Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu. This will be the artists’ first solo exhibition at the gallery, showing a series of new drawings and sculptural elements.

 

Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre © Courtesy Betts Project

Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu: Every Day Theatre © Courtesy Betts Project

 

All objects shown in the gallery are related to everyday objects, from chimney to columns – constructive but also hiding technics. All objects are changing constantly the cubical form of the room. They are objects in space. Every day objects. (more…)

“Piccolomini” drawings by Pier Vittorio Aureli at Betts Project

Betts Project presents Piccolomini, an exhibition of architect Pier Vittorio Aureli. This will be the artist’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, showing a new series of pastel drawings.

 

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

 

These pastels on paper are part of a large series developed during several years; in essence, they are landscapes. They play with the most fundamental datum of the landscape genre, which is the horizon line. In painting, the hori- zon line is the axis through which, in the last six centuries, every Western depiction of space has been constructed. The horizon line is the most artificial and arbitrary datum though which we produce representations of space, and yet it has become one of the most potent means of naturalizing our perception of space.


 

Practical information

“Piccolomini”
September 29 –  November 18, 2017
Betts Project Gallery
100 Central Street, London
United Kingdom

 


All the conflicts, cracks, and contradictions that have produced the land as we see it are subsumed and equalized by the establishment of the horizon line.

 

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

 

For centuries the horizon remained hidden behind elaborate compositions. It was only in17th century Dutch and Flemish landscape painting that the horizon line was made visible as the most explicit feature of the painting itself. In the paintings of Jan Porcellis, Jacob van Ruisdael and Pieter Snayers, the horizon becomes so overwhelming that it completely subsumes the vanishing point and any compositional feature that is not just the axis of the horizon.

 

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

 

The Piccolomini pastels on paper push to the extreme this logic of the horizon and as such they attempt to offer a final meditation on the very tradition of landscape painting at the moment in which this genre has been abandoned by artists and is seen as outmoded and romantic.

The series is named after general Ottavio Piccolomini for whom the Flemish baroque painter Pieter Snayers painted several battle scenes among which one of the most striking landscapes ever conceived – The Battle of Lützen (1632) – a painting that might have inspired one of the greatest paintings of the 17th century: Diego Velasquez’s Surrender of Breda (1634).

— Pier Vittorio Aureli, 2017

 

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

"Piccolomini" exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

“Piccolomini” exhibition view © Pier Vittorio Aureli, courtesy Betts Project

PIER VITTORIO AURELI was born in Rome in 1973. He graduated in architecture at the IUAV in Venice and earned his PhD at the TU Delft in 2005. His main research focus is the relationship between architectural form, political theory and urban history. He teaches at the Architectural Association in London and is also Visiting Professor at Yale School of Architecture. Aureli has written many essays on architecture and the city, and is the author of several books, notably ‘The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture’ (2011), ‘The Project of Autono- my: Politics and Architecture within and Against Capitalism’ (2008), and is the editor of the recently published collection of essays ‘The City as a Project’ (2014). Together with Martino Tattara he is the co-founder of the architectural office Dogma. Since its foundation Dogma has worked on the relationship between architecture and the city by focusing mostly on urban design and large-scale projects. In 2006 Dogma won the first Iakov Chernikhov Prize for the best emerging architectural practice. In 2013 an exhibition and accompanying cata- logue, ‘Dogma: 11 Projects’ opened at the Architectural Association in London. Part of the Dogma archive of drawings and collages is in the collection of the FRAC Centre in Orleans.
Aureli’s drawings are part of the Drawing Matter collection as well as private collections.

On Thursday 16 November 2017 Pier Vittorio Aureli will give a lecture at the Barbican, an event organised by the Architecture Foundation, in association with the Barbican.


 

News source and text: Betts Project
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“Penumbra” Studio Mumbai / Bijoy Jain at Betts Project Gallery

The exhibition will present a landscape through an exploration of material studies varying in scales, forms & techniques, all interspersed through intuition and intention, to allow the audience to immerse themselves in these distant landscapes where existence is not reactionary but elemental. These landscapes are both notional and real at the same time.

 

Studio Mumbai, Window Grids, 2016, paint on wood, varied sizes. ©Studio Mumbai. Courtesy Betts Project.

Studio Mumbai, Window Grids, 2016, paint on wood, varied sizes. ©Studio Mumbai. Courtesy Betts Project.

 

Betts Project is delighted to present “Penumbra”, an exhibition of renowned Indian architect Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition in the UK.  ‘Civilization is built on an aqueous foundation. A world that is in a constant flux, a culture continually in ebb and flow.’—Bijoy Jain (more…)

“Peter Märkli” exhibition of drawings and models at Betts Project

Betts Project is delighted to present a selling exhibition of renowned Swiss architect Peter Märkli, alongside relief-sketches by the sculptor Hans Josephsohn. This will be the artist’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, showing works –from his famous ‘Language drawings’ to 3D drawings and models– that are related to selected projects.

 

"Peter Märkli" exhibition view © Betts Project

“Peter Märkli” exhibition view © Betts Project

 

‘The sketch is the germ of an idea, with no detail in it. The sketch has to be kept small, otherwise you’d have to flesh out certain details. It’s like a writer coming up with an idea for a novel. He might be clear that there will be three main characters, but he doesn’t yet know how the plot will unfold. (more…)

Betts Project presents ‘Diorama’, an exhibition of British architects Caruso St John

The exhibition presents a selection of models for competitions as well as the model of their recent Stirling Prize winner project, the Newport Street Gallery. The 1:50 models in pastel colours belong to buildings the architects worked on during the last few years.

 

Another Glass House, 1991 © Caruso St John

Another Glass House, 1991 © Caruso St John

 

‘The models, and the photographs of the models are a way of getting closer and closer to an image that is already in our minds, it is about articulating all of the qualities in that image. I like the fact that in a competition one can try to communicate the concept and the atmosphere of a project in one or two such images. I would say that the preoccupation in the office is not the production of models, but of finding the image of a project.’ – Adam Caruso, OASE 84 (2011). (more…)

Fred Scott “In Search of the Lost Artwork” at Betts Project London

Betts Project is pleased to present ‘In Search of the Lost Artwork’, an exhibition of montages by British architectural theorist and lecturer Fred Scott.

 

Valise in Walnut, 2016, walnut, paper montages, edition of 5, different content © Fred Scott

Valise in Walnut, 2016, walnut, paper montages, edition of 5, different content © Fred Scott

 

Early in 2013 Fred Scott realised he had lost a triptych he made in 1997. ‘Dream of Flight’ was a montage using images from Le Corbusier’s pre-war publications, in which Scott blended Le Corbusier’s fascination for aircrafts and his associate Charlotte Perriand. For Fred Scott, Le Corbusier had a genius that has not been sufficiently recognized for gathering images to support his arguments, which is also almost an art in itself. The Radiant City in particular is an incredible collection of eclectic and surprising pictures, from similarly unexpected sources. Since then, Scott has been on a journey of memory to recreate his lost artwork. (more…)