Assemble completes London’s Goldsmiths Art Centre

Assemble were commissioned by Goldsmiths, University of London, to create a new public art gallery within the Grade II listed former Victorian bathhouse at Laurie Grove, New Cross. The 1000m2 building accommodates seven new gallery spaces, a café, curators’ studio and event space.

 

Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art © Assemble

Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art © Assemble

 

As a critical testing ground for exploration and discussion, Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art will be a significant cultural resource for students, artists and the wider public, offering a diverse programme focused on exhibitions, events and education. (more…)

“Assemble: How we build” exhibiton and installations at Architekturzentrum Wien

The exhibition features ten of their realised “prototypes” as large scale installations conveying a three-dimensional tactile experience. Videos, sketches and drawings, and other documentation show the interactive communal processes characteristic of these British architects’ work.

 

Goldsmiths Art Gallery, 2014 © Assemble

Goldsmiths Art Gallery, 2014 © Assemble

 

The Architekturzentrum Wien presents a worldwide premiere with the first overview of the work of Assemble. Eleven selected projects demonstrate the breadth of their work — from realised architecture projects, via furniture designs, to urban interventions. They depart from the classical paths of mediation for architecture and undertake an artistic re-reading of each project.

In addition, a concrete relationship is established in the exhibition between Assemble’s approach and architecture production in Vienna. During preparations for the exhibition a cooperation with Vienna University of Technology has established a visiting professor’s post — the results of these processes flow into the exhibition in spring 2017. What can Vienna learn from Assemble? The exhibition clearly shows new directions that the work of Assemble opens for the future of architecture. (more…)

“The Brutalist Playground” at Vitra Design Museum

The exhibition presents a new take on those Brutalist playgrounds, conceived as a hybrid somewhere between installation and walk-in sculpture for children and adults. The exhibition was commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in cooperation with the architecture collective Assemble (winner of the 2015 Turner Prize) and the artist Simon Terrill.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

 

The original playgrounds constructed in post-war Britain are mostly forgotten. Brutalism and its initial social agenda are stigmatized. The architectural style known as Brutalism emerged during the era of post-war reconstruction in Britain. In expressively shaped buildings constructed out of raw, heavy materials, it espoused an uncompromising formal language. All over the country, large-scale housing estates were built with distinctively designed playgrounds for children. Through the use of wood, brick, and especially concrete, the playgrounds were designed to fit in with the shapes and materials of their environments, demonstrating the principles of Brutalism on a small scale.


 

Practical information

The Brutalist Playground
January 14  –  April 16, 2017
Vitra Design Museum
Charles-Eames-Straße 2, Weil am Rhein
Germany

 


The exhibition reconstructs fragments from four Brutalist playgrounds: the »flying saucer« from the Churchill Gardens Estate, the slide tower from the Brownfield Estate, steps from the Brunel Estate (all in London), and a tunnel from the Park Hill Estate in Sheffield.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground «, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull, © RIBA

 

For the project, commissioned by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), the architecture collective Assemble in cooperation with the artist Simon Terrill chose a selection of drawings and photographs from the RIBA collections. Part architectural installation, part projections of archive material, part playground, the exhibition brings a neglected aspect of architectural history into the gallery space.

 

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1978 © John Donat - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1978 © John Donat – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1956 © John Maltby - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, Pimlico, 1956 © John Maltby – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

 

»Risk« and »play« are the central themes of the installation. Jane Hall from Assemble says: »You would look at the photographs of these playgrounds and ask: How was someone supposed to play on that? It’s not prescribed, and that’s the big unknown about this exhibition – how are people going to inhabit the space?«

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

 

Architects and urban planners advocated these kinds of playgrounds as places where children could play as freely as possible. But by the early 1970s these concepts had been discarded and were being criticised by both architects and educators. As a result, many of the playgrounds are now lost. Consigned to the archives, they are at most a footnote to an idiosyncrasy in the history of post-war architecture.

 

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, RIBA, London, 2015 Photo: Tristan Fewings © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

Installation view »The Brutalist Playground«, S1 Artspace, Sheffield, 2016 Photo: Alun Bull © RIBA

 

»The Brutalist Playground« enables a new, unbiased perspective on the original goals and designs of the architects of the time. In the exhibition children have the opportunity to »give free rein to their imagination«, just as the original architects intended. But adults, too, are invited to discover the play- scapes of the 1950s–1970s and the architectural ideas expressed in them.


 

News source: Vitra Design Museum
Subscribe here to get weekly updates about architecture events and exhibitions.

Architecture collective Assemble wins Turner Prize 2015

The jury’s decision was revealed on December 7, awarding a body of work that often deploys unconventional means, is self-initiated, self-made or self-organised, subverting typical hierarchies and procedures surrounding the realisation of architectural spaces.

 

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

 

The Turner Prize 2015 has been awarded to Assemble, the architecture collective. The results of the 2015 edition of the Prize were announced on the 7th of December at Tramway, Glasgow, in partnership with Tate. The £25,000 prize was presented by artist, musician and songwriter Kim Gordon during a live broadcast on Channel 4.

The jury applauded the strength of all the nominated artists’ work: Janice Kerbel, Bonnie Camplin, Nicole Wermers and Assemble, who were awarded the prize for working in tandem with communities to realise a ground-up approach to regeneration, city planning and development in opposition to corporate gentrification. (more…)

This summer, RIBA becomes The Brutalist Playground

Part sculpture, part architectural installation, all play: The Brutalist Playground is a new commission by Assemble and artist Simon Terrill exploring post-war design for play. It will be open to the public until August 16.

 

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

 

This summer the RIBA will present The Brutalist Playground – an exhibition that is part sculpture, part architectural installation, which invites people of all ages to come and play, the Brutalist way.

Occupying the entire Architecture Gallery, the immersive landscape is a new commission by Turner Prize nominated design and architecture collective Assemble and artist Simon Terrill. It explores the abstract concrete playgrounds that were designed as part of post-war housing estates in the mid-twentieth century, but which no longer exist. They became playgrounds unsuitable for play.

 

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

 The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

 

The exhibition draws on features from a number of London estates including Churchill Gardens, Pimlico; the Brunel Estate, Paddington and the Brownfield Estate in Poplar. The playgrounds were often made from concrete, cast into sculptural forms, which presented a distinct move away from previous playground design. They were envisaged as a key aspect of the estate layout and design and as such reflect the preoccupations and social theories of society at that time.

 

Churchill Gardens, 1956 © John Maltby - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens, 1956 © John Maltby – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, archive image © John Donat - RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Churchill Gardens Estate, archive image © John Donat – RIBA Library Photographs Collection

Balfron Tower playgound, 2015 © Assemble and Simon Terrill, 2015

Balfron Tower playgound, 2015 © Assemble and Simon Terrill, 2015

 

Assemble and Simon Terrill have drawn inspiration from photographs and visual material in the RIBA’s collections, documenting the playgrounds when they were newly built and in use. The exhibition installation will recreate visual elements from the playgrounds in reconstituted foam, creating an interactive, contemporary space where the viewer becomes participant and in this way completes the work. Archive images of the original playgrounds will be projected on the walls.

The exhibition and installation will be accompanied by a season of talks and events from June to August 2015. Check the online agenda clicking here.

 

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

The Brutalist Playground by Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

Assemble and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA

Assemble members and Simon Terrill © Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for RIBA


 

Practical Information

The Brutalist Playground
June 10 2015 / August 16 2015
Monday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm
Tuesdays from 10am to 8pm

The Architecture Gallery, RIBA
66 Portland Place, London

Entrance is free.

 


 

Exhibition information and images courtesy of the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Architecture practice Assemble, shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2015

This is the first time ever for a design studio to be a nominee for this prize. Assemble’s projects focus on urban regeneration and the need for social exchange in unused or neglected areas in the city.

 

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

Granby Four Streets © Assemble

 

The four nominees for the Turner Prize 2015 have been announced, among which are Assemble Studio, a London-based collective of architects, artists and designers.  This is the first time ever for a design studio to be shortlisted for  this prestigious prize that rewards an artist’s specific exhibition or work of art of the previous year.

 

(more…)