“Robert Mallet-Stevens” exhibition at CIVA Brussels

The exhibition proposes an itinerary across the work of Mallet-Stevens, richly illustrated by drawings, photos, historical documents, furniture and textiles.

 

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

 

Robert Mallet-Stevens is one of the major figures of French architecture during the period between WWI and WWII. It is to him that we owe the villa Noailles in Hyères and the villa Cavrois near Lille, as well as the mansion houses on the rue Mallet-Stevens, smong many other works.


 

Practical information

“Robert Mallet-Stevens”
November 15, 2016- February 12, 2017
CIVA Foundation
Rue de l’Ermitage 55, Brussels
Belgium

 


The exhibition proposes an itinerary across the work of Mallet-Stevens, richly illustrated by drawings, photos, historical documents, furniture and textiles.

 

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

 

The exhibition programme will also be accompanied by lectures, film screenings and children’s activities.

 

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

 

Mallet-Stevens came from a prestigious Belgian family of artists, critics and collectors: his grandfather was art critic Arthur Stevens, the brother of the painter Alfred Stevens, and his aunt Suzanne was the wife of Adolphe Stoclet, sponsor of the Palais Stoclet, whom the young Mallet-Stevens visited frequently and who would have a decisive influence over him.

 

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens  © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

Robert Mallet-Stevens © Robert Mallet-Stevens, CIVA

 

He made his debut before the Great War as an architectural critic in Belgian magazines, and as interior designer for Parisian fashion designers. After the war, he became known as a film decorator.

In 1923, a young couple of patrons of Parisian art, the Noailles, commissioned him a winter house in Hyères; this would come to be the Noailles villa, a future high-place of the artistic avant-garde. This marks the beginning of an architectural career which, in line with the modern spirit, will also invest in the creation of furniture, interior decoration and the construction of exhibition pavilions, not to mention its involvement in the Mythical Union of Modern Artists.


 

News source and text: CIVA
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