“Olivo Barbieri. Images 1978-2014” Retrospective at MAXXI

The exhibition is a retrospective that retraces Barbieri’s themes and research, through over 100 works and seven sections, illustrating the photographer’s career from the late 1970s to the present.

 

"Site Specific Houston" © Olivo Barbieri

“Site Specific Houston” © Olivo Barbieri

 

MAXXI Museum in Rome is hosting a retrospective exhibition on Olivo Barbieri, one of Italy’s certainly most acclaimed contemporary photographers for his pictures of cities, urban scenes and  technical experimentation. The exhibition takes form around a quote by Barbieri himself, designed as an itinerary for a critical, new and annotated interpretation of the work of this renowned artist.

 

Lhasa Tibet 2000 © Olivo Barbieri

Lhasa Tibet 2000 © Olivo Barbieri

"Not so Far East " Linyi China 2001 © Olivo Barbieri

“Not so Far East ” Linyi China 2001 © Olivo Barbieri

 

The exhibition is a retrospective that retraces Barbieri’s themes and research, through over 100 works and seven sections, underscoring his constant attention to the theme of perception, comprising photographs and films that illustrate the photographer’s career from the late 1970s to the present. With his work, this artist casts doubt over the conventional modes of representation, to instead breathe life into new narratives by means of continuous, incessant perceptive experiments.

 

"Virtual Truth" Canton China 1998 © Olivo Barbieri

“Virtual Truth” Canton China 1998 © Olivo Barbieri

Beijing China 2001 © Olivo Barbieri

Beijing China 2001 © Olivo Barbieri

 

Olivo Barbieri. Images 1978-2014  is curated by Francesca Fabiani and will be open until November 15, 2015.

 


 

About the exhibition

«I’ve never been interested in photography, but in images. I believe my work starts where photography ends» -Olivo Barbieri-

This apparently paradoxical statement contains a fundamental key to the understanding of the complex research of Olivo Barbieri (Carpi, Modena 1954), one of the most important figures in contemporary photography.

 

Capri 2013 © Olivo Barbieri

Capri 2013 © Olivo Barbieri

 

Barbieri is mainly known for his analysis on the shape and the iconography of contemporary cities, yet it would be too simple to reduce his work exclusively to an investigation of urban space and architecture: while this is the framework in which his research forms, it has more to do with an analysis -and a questioning- of the concept of perception, our ability to see and interpret reality.

 

"Site Specific Roma" © Olivo Barbieri

“Site Specific Roma” © Olivo Barbieri

"Site Specific Las Vegas" © Olivo Barbieri

“Site Specific Las Vegas” © Olivo Barbieri

 

"Canaletto" Uffizi 2002 © Olivo Barbieri

“Canaletto” Uffizi 2002 © Olivo Barbieri

 

This is the first step in order to understand it. Through an experimental use of photographic instruments and language, Barbieri undermines the usual modes of representation, clearing the way for new and -more often than not- surprising interpretations: what interests him is not to faithfully reproduce, nor to make the world spectacular, but to translate his personal perception of what’s visible into narration, into a story.

 

Flippers 1977-78 © Olivo Barbieri

Flippers 1977-78 © Olivo Barbieri

 

The exhibition, conceived as a broad retrospective of his work, is structured in seven thematic sections that allow visitors to follow the development of Barbieri’s thought from the seventies up until the present day: from the early pictures of pinball machines discovered in an abandoned factory that play with the decadent icons of modernity, to estranging nocturnal images of urban settings that are contrasted with visions of paintings in museums (even more ambiguous owing to their appearance of reality); from the exploration of Italian cities and of their outskirts in the 1980s to the numerous trips to China and the Far East; from the first experiments with “selective focus” in the 1990s, to the aerial views of cities such as Rome, Las Vegas and Shanghai, the starting point of his site-specific series, which features more than forty towns and megalopolis around the world.

 

Capri 2013 © Olivo Barbieri

Capri 2013 © Olivo Barbieri

 

His bird-eye shots of cities, taken using the “selective focus” technique (which highlights only some elements, deliberately leaving the rest of the picture out of focus), ushered in a new way of perceiving the city that, thanks to the conscious introduction of photographic “errors,” is presented to us in an unprecedented manner, closer to a scaled down model than to a real place.

The fine line between a photograph that represents a place and the use of a language that ends up decreeing the ambiguity of any representation is where we can position Barbieri’s photography.

 

Lugo Ravenna 1982 © Olivo Barbieri

Lugo Ravenna 1982 © Olivo Barbieri

 

The seven sections of the exhibition, despite a necessary and inevitable schematization, set out to suggest a reading of his work on the basis of just this fine line: poised between the certain and the uncertain, between the real and the plausible, between knowledge and obvious. Between the horizontality of his journeys on the surface of the planet and the verticality of a journey that investigates the internal processes of seeing and knowing.

 

Pellestrina Venezia 1988 © Olivo Barbieri

Pellestrina Venezia 1988 © Olivo Barbieri

 

As well as these seven sections, the exhibition also features a series of in depth Focus areas that are dedicated respectively to video productions (with 9 films on display); to editorial productions thanks to the presentation of a rich bibliographic section; and also a space dedicated to photos taken by Barbieri that are stored in the MAXXI collection, the result of ad hoc commissions, which demonstrate a long lasting and fruitful collaboration between Barbieri and the museum, which began in 2003, while the huge building designed by Zaha Hadid was under construction.

 


 

Exhibition Information

Olivo Barbieri. Images 1978-2014
29 May, 2015 / 15 November, 2015

MAXXI. Museo di Arte del secolo XXI di Roma
Gallery 5
Via Guido Reni, 4a
00196 Roma

 


 

Images and information courtesy of MAXXI Roma