Mies van der Rohe Emerging Architect Award 2015 to “Casa Luz” by Arquitectura-G

The Mies van der Rohe Emerging Architect Award 2015 went to the Barcelona based studio Architectura-G for its “Casa Luz” (House Light) in Cilleros (Caceres, Spain), a detached house completely renovated from a badly damaged earlier.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

The project  ‘Casa Luz’ were selected from 420 works from 36 European countries. The award is the most prestigious architectural recognition of the European Union and one of the most reputable internationally. The ceremony was held on May 8 in the Mies van der Rohe Barcelona Pavilion. The jury praised the “simplicity and clarity of space” and its high environmental quality and color palette used.

The Chair of the Jury of the Mies van der Rohe, Cino Zucchi, also BigMat Award ’15 member of the jury, highlighted the following aspects of the project:

“The jury felt that the designers understood well and solved brilliantly the constructive and economic constraints of the project, a new structure inserted in the stone party walls of an existing town house. A direct dialogue with the client and the clear strategy to build the program around a new courtyard allowed the simple yet effective construction of this single house. The architects used the existing stone façades and adobe party walls to achieve very high spatial qualities with very cheap construction materials.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

The Jury appreciated the simplicity and clarity of the spaces, their high environmental quality and the colour palette resulting from the terracotta tiles left unfinished, showing that a good architecture does not need to be expensive or spectacular.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

In the evaluation process of an important award like the Mies van der Rohe one, the jury is called to observe and judge the architectural quality of projects, which are very different in their program, context, scale, and cultural milieu. Today Europe is confronting its rich and varied heritage with the great changes the environments and societies are going through. Apart from the great differences still existing between its regions, we share the idea that the act of design, beside its necessary response to its functional and economic conditions, should enhance the comfort, the degree of social interaction, and the cultural life of its users.”

 

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

Description by Arquitectura-G.

This is a traditional village house with an elongated narrow floor plan between two boundary walls that opens up onto a kitchen garden at the rear. The house was in a ruinous state, the result of general neglect and the passing of time.

Luz, the owner, wanted a light-filled house that enjoy the outdoors and the presence of the garden. The central area of ​​the house did not enjoy light or ventilation, making it less habitable. These conditions, combined with a low budget, led to adopt a simple strategy project; empty and completely clean the inside keeping the stone facades and party walls of mud, organizing a new interior around a courtyard.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

There are times when a contemporary approach is not so much a matter of using cutting-edge materials, but rather of putting local know-how to savvy use, taking advantage of solidly reliable natural materials that are in keeping with the economic and geographical context. And this was precisely one such occasion.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

Four structures staggered at varying levels were erected around the courtyard. Each of these ‘trays’ is put to a single use, forming the kitchen, living room, 1st and 2nd bedrooms. Presiding over the courtyard is a birch tree, placing the living room and the kitchen between the greenery of the interior and that of the kitchen garden. The living room and kitchen are crossed by the stairway, thereby preventing the circulation from invading the bedroom spaces, which are located between the courtyard and the main façade. Each bedroom has its own ensuite bathroom which opens up onto the courtyard and which can be accessed from both the bedroom itself and the corridor. 15 x 15 cm glossy white glazed ceramic tiles were used on the bathroom walls. In addition to their hygienic and water-proofing properties, they reflect the leaves of the tree and the light from the patio, therefore doubly enhancing the overall effect.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

The choice of a deciduous tree guarantees shade in the hottest months of the year, whilst in winter allowing the sunlight to enter and warm the rooms. It also acts as a visual filter between the rooms.

The metal grid that acts as a walkway surrounds the entire courtyard, thereby allowing for two-fold interior-exterior circulation. In addition to its function as a walkway, it also doubles up as a bench, thereby extending the room programme out towards the courtyard.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

Both the structure and the construction are of an almost overwhelming simplicity. The project unabashedly displays its outward appearance, forming a bold and deliberate contrast with the irregular textures of the boundary walls and the stone, which have been whitewashed. The aim was to create a setting in which the red tones of the ceramic tiles and the deep green leaves of the birch tree inevitably catch the eye, allowing the light that filters through these materials to create the various hues and shades that are cast on the walls and floors throughout the day. The ceramic tiles themselves add the desired texture and richness of colour, thereby doing away with the need for painting or drop ceilings.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

The existing gaps on the façade limited the position of the new floor slabs, making it necessary to create a structure edge that would not overly restrict the open interior heights. The solution adopted was a single grid structure using IPE 100 beams, with 1 m grooved and tongued ceramic boards resting on the lower edges. By adding a compression layer the resulting structure is a mere 15 cm thick, therefore creating a sensation of lightness from the courtyard that contrasts with the solid rugosity of the boundary walls.

 

Casa Luz © José Hevia

Casa Luz © José Hevia

 

The entire ground floor is clad in an all-ecompassing layer of red Catalan tiles, which match the roofs and bring out the tones of the grating around the tree. The summer living room is situated on the ground floor at the back of the house, designed so that it can be opened up entirely onto both the courtyard and the kitchen garden, allowing the inhabitants to fully enjoy the sensations created by the cooling breeze on lazy summer afternoons.

 


 

Documents

 

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

Casa Luz © Arquitectura-G

 


 

News source: Arquitectura-G