“Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country” at DAM Frankfurt

The exhibition, which DAM created and curated for the German Pavilion at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition 2016 – La Biennale di Venezia, will be presented on two floors at DAM, and feature updated and expanded subject matter, as well as documentation and a review of the German Pavilion in Venice.

 

Sri-Kamadchi-Ampal Temple, Hamm in Nordrhein-Westfalen Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

Sri-Kamadchi-Ampal Temple, Hamm in Nordrhein-Westfalen. Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

 

The exhibition responds to the fact that in 2015 the German borders were left open for around 900 000 refugees, and prompts reflection about Germany as an open immigration country.


 

Practical information

“Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country”
March 4, 2016 – September 10, 2017
Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM)
Schaumainkai 43, Frankfurt am Main
Germany

 


In close cooperation with Doug Saunders, eight theories about “Arrival Cities” were devised that aim to trigger a change in the way we view immigrant neighborhoods. While providing their inhabitants and new arrivals with the most important conditions for them to be able to settle down and become integrated, these have to date for the most part been seen as problem areas. Arrival City Offenbach, the neighboring city of Frankfurt/Main, is accorded great significance in the exhibition. 58 % of its population have a migration background, and there are 156 nationalities living peacefully side by side.

 

Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country. German Pavilion, 15th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia 2016

Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country. German Pavilion, 15th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia 2016

Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country. German Pavilion, 15th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia 2016

Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country. German Pavilion, 15th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia 2016

 

Before many of the refugees in Germany can become regular immigrants, thousands of them live in emergency and communal accommodation. The structures for refugees that have been, or are still being realized, and which since March 2016 have been part of the online data base www.makingheimat.de, are given their own exhibition floor in DAM. All submitted projects have been updated and organized according to federal states, each of which was allocated refugees according to the limits of its capacity as laid down by the “Königsteiner Schlüssel” distribution formula.

 

 

Architect: Jan Schabert (günther & schabert Architekten), Munich Light-frame construction hall emergency program, Munich Light-frame hall, inside \ photo: © Michael Heinrich

Architect: Jan Schabert (günther & schabert Architekten), Munich. Light-frame construction hall emergency program, Munich. Light-frame hall, inside \ photo: © Michael Heinrich

Architect: Gerstberger Architekten GmbH, Munich \ LiWood, Munich Refugee accommodation, Munich Preparation of the modules / photo: © Michael Heinrich

Architect: Gerstberger Architekten GmbH, Munich \ LiWood, Munich. Refugee accommodation, Munich. Preparation of the modules / photo: © Michael Heinrich

 

The exhibition presents 57 refugee housing projects: it shows both generally feasible modular construction projects and regional particularities. Seven exceptional solutions are presented by means of on-site talks and current photographs by Anja Weber. They prove that architecture and urban planning can make a significant contribution to integration.

 

Mosque in Sandgasse, Offenbach Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

Mosque in Sandgasse, Offenbach. Photo: © Judith Raum, 2010

Nihad Moufadil, 31 years, landscape architect, Quartiersmanagement Mathildenviertel, Offenbach am Main Photo: Jessica Schäfer

Nihad Moufadil, 31 years, landscape architect, Quartiersmanagement Mathildenviertel, Offenbach am Main. Photo: Jessica Schäfer

 

The current refugee situation and the demands being made on arrival city districts have one thing in common: There is a housing crisis in Germany. Accommodation that everyone can afford has to be built. For this reason, likewise selected housing projects in various major German cities will also be showcased.

 

Frankfurt Praunheim estate Photo: © Peter Körner, 2011

Frankfurt Praunheim estate. Photo: © Peter Körner, 2011

Frankfurt Praunheim estate, 1929 Photo: Hermann Collischonn, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Deutsches Kunstarchiv, NL-May, Ernst, I,B 40(0030)

Frankfurt Praunheim estate, 1929. Photo: Hermann Collischonn, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Deutsches Kunstarchiv, NL-May, Ernst, I,B 40(0030)

 

Accompanying the exhibition, the “Atlas of refugee housing” will be published and there will be an extensive supporting program.

 

Catalogue “Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country.” Publisher: Hatje Cantz Editors: Peter Cachola Schmal, Oliver Elser, Anna Scheuermann Design: Something Fantastic, Berlin

Catalogue “Making Heimat. Germany, Arrival Country.”. Publisher: Hatje Cantz. Editors: Peter Cachola Schmal, Oliver Elser, Anna Scheuermann. Design: Something Fantastic, Berlin


 

News source and text: DAM
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