Last days for “Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920 – 1990” at Tschoban Foundation

The exhibition features Berlin as seen throught the eyes of the most successful architects of the XXth Century: from actually built projects by Álvaro Siza and OMA to utopian visions by Bernard Tschumi, Hans Scharoun, Mies Van der Rohe and many others.

 

OMA, Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Matthias Sauerbruch, Elia Zenghelis, 1980 – 1990 House at Checkpoint Charlie Competition, building complex, isometry Watercolour on Xerox copy 82 x 166 cm © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © OMA

OMA, Office for Metropolitan Architecture, Matthias Sauerbruch, Elia Zenghelis (1980 – 1990)  House at Checkpoint Charlie. Competition, building complex, isometry  © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © OMA

 

Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920–1990 shows an exciting selection of important moments in Berlin’s urban and architectural development, illustrated by hand-drawn designs by Hans Scharoun, Hans Poelzig, Frei Otto, Gottfried Böhm, Zaha Hadid, Álvaro Siza Vieira and other renowned architects. A selection: the exhibition should therefore by no means be seen as a complete chronological documentation of the capital’s architecture during this period. It is rather a presentation of the variety of ideas and visions for Berlin, a stimulus to comparison of the drawn and the actually built architecture, and a highlighting of the high artistic quality of the exhibited works.


 

Practical Information

Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920–1990
25 February 2017 – 25 June 2017
Tchoban Foundation. Museum of Architectural Drawing
Christinenstraße 18a, 10119 Berlin
Germany

 


Hardly another city has undergone such architectural transformations in the twentieth century as has Berlin: historical events, economic crises, the scars of war, reconstruction, the division of the city and its reunification – all this necessitated new planning and afforded architects and city planners room and occasion for new projects, new ideas and new visions for Berlin. And the city is still growing and developing, so that the discussion about the future appearance of the German capital is today more relevant than ever.

 

Zaha Hadid, 1986 Office building on Kurfuerstendamm Spray paint on cardboard 97 x 200 cm © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © Zaha Hadid Foundation

Zaha Hadid, 1986. Office building on Kurfuerstendamm. © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main © Zaha Hadid Foundation

 

In addition to realized building projects, such as the apartment house “Bonjour Tristesse” by Álvaro Siza Vieira and the apartment house at Checkpoint Charlie by OMA, the exhibition also presents competition entries such as Hans Scharoun’s 1922 designs submitted to the first competition for the construction of the high-rise building at the Friedrichstraße train station, a competition in which other well-known architects also took part, including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and Hans Poelzig.

 

Hans Poelzig, 1919 – 1920 Theatre Project (Grosses Schauspielhaus), Berlin Lobby, Draft, Sketch Coloured wax crayons on tracing paper 27,7 x 32,6 cm

Hans Poelzig, 1919 – 1920. Theatre Project (Grosses Schauspielhaus), Berlin

Hans Poelzig, 1928/29 Exhibition Grounds, Berlin Design: perspective view Pastel on paper on brown cardboard 27.7 x 55.7 cm ©Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main

Hans Poelzig, 1928/29  Exhibition Grounds, Berlin. Design: perspective view ©Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main

 

The role played in German history by the Reichstag and its significance for Berlin is undisputed; projects for the Reichstag building are therefore represented in the exhibition by several prominent works, ranging from Gottfried Böhm’s study showing the walk-in glass dome, through Christo’s project for a wrapped Reichstag, to the competition entry by Lord Norman Foster, drawn by Helmut Jacoby.

A further focus of the exhibition is the visions for the capital that were created as part of the competition “Berlin Tomorrow” at the beginning of the 1990s, with the aim of developing ideas for restructuring the former old town of Berlin after reunification. Many well-known architects participated in this competition, three of whom, Bernard Tschumi, Mario Bellini and Manuel de Solà-Morales, are represented in the exhibition.

 

R. Rettig, 1930 Cinema Atlantik, Berlin, 1930 Presentation drawing: View/Perspective/Roadside building Charcoal, pencil, on tracing paper, on white cardboard 56.8 x 78.5 cm © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main

R. Rettig, Cinema Atlantik, Berlin, (1930)  Presentation drawing: View/Perspective/Roadside building © Deutsches Architekturmuseum, Frankfurt am Main; Photo: Uwe Dettmar, Frankfurt am Main

 

The exhibition Berlin Projects. Architectural Drawings 1920–1990 continues the successful collaboration with the German Museum of Architecture in Frankfurt am Main, where an exhibition by the Tchoban Foundation was already held in 2010.

A catalogue will be published to accompany the exhibition.

Curators of this exhibition are Nadejda Bartels, from the Museum for Architectural Drawing, Berlin and Inge Wolf, from the German Museum of Architecture, Frankfurt am Main.


 

News source: Tschoban Foundation
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