“Günter Haese. Sculptures” at Elvira González gallery

The gallery Elvira González presents a selection of sculptures by the German artist Günter Haese (Kiel 1924 – Düsseldorf 2016) made over four decades. This is the artist’s third exhibition in the gallery.

 

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

 

Trained as an artist at the School of Düsseldorf in the fifties (where he studied with Bruno Goller, Ewald Mataré and Joseph Beuys) Haese applied watch movements to explore the rules of balance through the control of movement and weight. His work materializes a constant attempt to reach the limit of the stable. This not only responds constructively to his deep interest in material balance, but was determined by his study of cybernetic theorems and cellular structures. Titles of his sculptures, such as Sinus (1987), Soma (2000), or Il Principe (1962), show us the influence that these scientific matters had at the time of conceiving his works.


 

Practical information

“Günter Haese. Sculptures”
10 April – 1 June, 2019
Elvira González gallery
Hermanos Álvarez Quintero street, 1, Madrid
Spain

 


Haese obsessively explored the beauty of forms in nature and the way they connect, creating a personal aesthetic universe that facilitated the path to their understanding. This deep curiosity allowed him to develop his artistic practice navigating between different fields of knowledge, looking from several angles instead of in one direction. In 1964 he studied at the Documenta in Kassel, being the first German artist to create, in this same year, an individual exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 1966 he represented Germany at the Venice Biennale.

 

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

BIOGRAPHY

Günter Haese (Kiel 1924 – Düsseldorf 2016) began to paint and draw from a very young age in a natural and self-taught way until he was 26 years old and enrolled in the Art Academy of Düsseldorf where he studied under the tutelage of Edwald Mataré and Bruno Goller, together with other artists such as Joseph Beuys, Erwin Heerich, or Georg Meistermann.

 

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

 

He quickly became part of the Master Class of Sculpture with the artist Edwald Mataré, who later assisted as an assistant in his work for the Cologne Cathedral. It was Mataré who took seriously his careful studies of nature, orienting him towards sculpture. Influenced by his master, Haese abandoned the engraving of crystal plate monotypes, in which he was already exploring reticular motifs, and found the materials for his new works while dismantling a broken watch.

 

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

 

From then on he used pliers, clamps and welders to build his works with brass meshes and copper wires. He thus evolved towards more stable figures made with chronometer pieces, and went on to design what he would later define as “freer rhythmic and scenic events”. In 1963 he sent the Junger Westen Prize his first series of sculptures, relatively simple compared to later ones. With surprising rapidity, he expands and defines in the following years his personal vocabulary with which he worked since then.

 

“Günter Haese. Sculptures” © Elvira González gallery

 

In 1964 he presented his first exhibition at the Ulmer Museum. It raised so much expectation that in the same year he held an individual exhibition at the MOMA, Museum of Modern Art in New York and was invited to participate in the Documenta III of the city of Kassel with artists such as Hans Arp, Francis Bacon, Max Bill, Constantin Brâncusi, Alexander Calder, Charles Eames, Wassily Kandinsky, Joan Miró, Piet Mondrian and Egon Schiele among others.


 

News source: Elvira González gallery
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