“The Future City” exhibition at RIBA, as part of “Foresight Future of Cities”

The exhibition is concerned with how future cities have been visualised, what they sought to communicate and why. The aim is to identify and understand the dominant paradigms that have been portrayed in these visualisations.

 

Studio Linfors (Clouds Architecture Office), Cloud Skippers, 2009. © Studio Lindfors

Studio Linfors (Clouds Architecture Office), Cloud Skippers, 2009. © Studio Lindfors

 

This exhibition is created by the Government Office for Science in partnership with RIBA. It is part of the UK Government’s Foresight Future of Cities Project. It will be open from February 10 2015 to March 31 2015 at The Practice Space, RIBA 66 Portland Place, London.

 

Geoffrey Jellicoe, Motopia, A Study in the Evolution of Urban Landscape, 1961. Illustrated in 1960 by Arthur Radebaugh for ‘Closer Than We Think’. © Tribune Content Agency, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission.

Geoffrey Jellicoe, Motopia, A Study in the Evolution of Urban Landscape, 1961. Illustrated in 1960 by Arthur Radebaugh for ‘Closer Than We Think’. © Tribune Content Agency, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

 

Ebeneezer Howard, ‘Ward and centre garden city diagram’, 1902, Extract from Garden cities of to-morrow (London, 1902), 2nd ed., diagram 3 after p. 22. RIBA Library Photographs Collection.

Ebeneezer Howard, ‘Ward and centre garden city diagram’, 1902, Extract from Garden cities of to-morrow (London, 1902), 2nd ed., diagram 3 after p. 22. RIBA Library Photographs Collection.

 

Constant Nieuwenhuys, ‘Symbolische voorstelling van New Babylon’ (Symbolic Representation of New Babylon), Collage, 1969. © Gemeentemuseum Den Haag.

Constant Nieuwenhuys, ‘Symbolische voorstelling van New Babylon’ (Symbolic Representation of New Babylon), Collage, 1969. © Gemeentemuseum Den Haag.

 

About “Foresight Future of Cities”
The objective of the Future of Cities project is to create an evidence base that can be used to inform policy options. It also aims to influence practice at the local and city regional level while creating and supporting futures-based networks spanning policy-makers, academics and practitioners.

 

Tomas Saraceno, Cloud Cities, 2011. Sketch Installation view, “Cloud Cities”, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin 2011. Photography by Studio Tomás Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno, Cloud Cities, 2011. Sketch Installation view, “Cloud Cities”, Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin 2011. Photography by Studio Tomás Saraceno

 

Eugène Hénard, The Cities of The Future, published in American City, January 1911

Eugène Hénard, The Cities of The Future, published in American City, January 1911

 

Figure 4: Peter Cook (Archigram), Plug-in City, Overhead View, (Axonometric) 1964. Image supplied by the Archigram Archives © 2014

Peter Cook (Archigram), Plug-in City, Overhead View, (Axonometric) 1964. Image supplied by the Archigram Archives © 2014

 

Extract of the exhibition from RIBA:

Imagining the city of the future has long been a source of fascination for architects, artists, and designers. Through drawings, maps and film, urban futures have been depicted in many ways — from tranquil green utopias and great domed constructions to vast, inter connected mega-structures and machines.

 

Rem Koolhaas, Asian City of Tomorrow, SMLXL, 1995, © Image courtesy of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

Rem Koolhaas, Asian City of Tomorrow, SMLXL, 1995, © Image courtesy of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

 

Paul Rudolph, (1918-1997): Lower Manhattan Expressway, project. New York City. Perspective to the east, 1972. New York, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

Paul Rudolph, (1918-1997): Lower Manhattan Expressway, project. New York City. Perspective to the east, 1972. New York, Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

 

David George Emmerich, `Agglomération (sous une coupole stéréométrique)’,1958-1960, Encre sur papier, 75 x 105.5 cm, Photographie: François Lauginie, Collection FRAC Centre, Orléans.

David George Emmerich, `Agglomération (sous une coupole stéréométrique)’,1958-1960, Encre sur papier, 75 x 105.5 cm, Photographie: François Lauginie, Collection FRAC Centre, Orléans.

 

Cities, once perceived as a problem, are now recognised as the heart of the country’s social, cultural and economic life. By 2065 the UK population may rise by 25% to as much as 80.5 million making it one of the EU’s most populous countries. This will create many challenges for cities. But there is a great opportunity for them to evolve and reinvent themselves, fostering a better quality of life for their inhabitants.

 

Cedric Price, ‘Potteries Thinkbelt, North Staffordshire, England: View from a railbus, Longton Faculty Area’ in Architectural Design Volume XXXVI, October 1966, cover page London: Standard Catalogue Co. [1966] W.A755. Collection Centre Canadien d’Architecture/ Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal

Cedric Price, ‘Potteries Thinkbelt, North Staffordshire, England: View from a railbus, Longton Faculty Area’ in Architectural Design Volume XXXVI, October 1966, cover page London: Standard Catalogue Co. [1966] W.A755. Collection Centre Canadien d’Architecture/ Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal

Marcos Novak, Mutable Algorithmic Landscapes, 2000. © Marcos Novak

Marcos Novak, Mutable Algorithmic Landscapes, 2000. © Marcos Novak

 

Drawing on the work of the Foresight Future of Cities Project and the RIBA, this exhibition explores a visual history of the future to outline the UK’s key urban challenges over the coming decades. What do changing technologies, demographics and lifestyles mean for our cities? How can emerging tools help future proof cities and their citizens? What might your city look like in 2065?

 

Alison and Peter Smithson, Collage for Golden Lane, 1952. Photo © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Philippe Migeat.

Alison and Peter Smithson, Collage for Golden Lane, 1952. Photo © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Philippe Migeat.

 

Patrick Abercrombie, Forshaw’s London Community map, Social Analysis, 1943.

Patrick Abercrombie, Forshaw’s London Community map, Social Analysis, 1943.

 

“Future of cities: a visual history of the future”

All the images from this post came from the research paper “Future of cities: a visual history of the future”,  published by the british Government Office for Science within the work Foresight Future of Cities Project. It is available here. All the documents published are also available here.