[Exhibition] “Tubology – Our lives in tubes” at FRAC Grand Large

Tubes are everywhere! Inside us – we’re made of tubes: auditory, digestive, bronchial and so on and so forth. All around us – in our Hauts-de-France Region you can hardly ignore the factory chimneys still standing up and down the coast. Outside us – the pipes and post-industrial cables that mean we can be connected and linked up with each other, with all the potential for doing things remotely offered by the Internet.

 

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

 

But here’s the thing: all this striving not to “go down the tubes” is generating an ecological emergency. So what kinds of mental, social and environmental ecologies do we need to take proper care of ourselves and others, humans and non-humans (animals, plants, minerals, etc.)? How can we do away with local and global hierarchies within the system of overall interconnectivity that is our lot today?


 

Practical information

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes”
April 21 — December 30,  2018
FRAC Grand Large
503 Avenue des Bancs de Flandres,  Dunkerque
France

 


There’s a tube management problem here. Historically we’ve moved from industrially structured, mainly vertical organisation of work, to a more transversal, post-industrial system. The tubes mutated into more flexible cables, and then into WiFi – more disembodied and dematerialised.

 

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

 

Overheating problems – including mental burnout and global warming – are now affecting both the industrial and post-industrial models of value production. What new types of collective management of human and non-human resources do we need so as not to leave the organising of “our lives in the tubes” in the hands of GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon)?

 

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

 

In L’Inséparé – essai sur un monde sans Autre (Unseparate: Essay on an Otherless World) Dominique Quessada derives his title concept from an “unseparated reality in which all globalised phenomena are linked, interrelated and co- dependent.”
Thinking along the same lines, Timothy Morton, in his Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World, reminds us that “there is no ontological outside”; and that it is simplistic to try to sweep awkward questions – agribusiness, the end of fossil fuels, nuclear waste, etc. – under the carpet, just as it is irresponsible to unload our technological detritus onto countries with less geopolitical clout.

 

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

 

In this exhibition KVM (Lee Ju Hyun and Ludovic Burel) address the issue of caring for the living world – bioethics – via two special plantings of tubular peppers and tubers effected for “Tubology” by home gardeners, market gardeners and botanists in and around Dunkirk (Grande-Synthe, Leffrinckoucke, Téteghem, Audruicq, etc.). Essentially critical in its approach, “Tubology – Our Lives in Tubes” offers a totally new reading of the Frac Grand Large collection from the 1960s up to the present day, and speculates about the prerequisites for rendering art and design relevant to a society mutating at high speed.

 

"Tubology - Our lives in tubes" exhibition view © FRAC

“Tubology – Our lives in tubes” exhibition view © FRAC

 

With : Archizoom, Ralph Ball & Maxine Naylor, Yto Barrada, Walead Beshty, Bless, Dirk Braeckman, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Achille & Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, Joe Colombo, Nicolas Deshayes, Sam Durant, Charles Eames, Didier Faustino, Peter Friedl, Georg Gatsas, Piero Gatti & Cesare Paolini & Franco Teodoro, Piero Gilardi, Konstantin Grcic, Ann Veronica Janssens, Hella Jongerius, Hannu Kähönen, Scott King, Josef Koudelka, La Monte Young & Marian Zazeela, Frédéric Le Junter, Émilien Leroy, O. Winston Link, Matthew McCaslin, Allan McCollum, Jasper Morrison, Olivier Mourgue, Marc Newson, Verner Panton, Gaetano Pesce, Géry Petit, Mathias Poledna, Bertjan Pot & Marcel Wanders, Terry Riley, Ugo Rondinone, Denis Santachiara, Bruno Serralongue, Taryn Simon, Meredith Sparks, Robert Stadler, Dennis Stock, Mika Tajima, Rosemarie Trockel, Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt, Maarten Van Severen, Barbara Visser, Rémy Zaugg.


 

News source: FRAC Grand Large
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