“Buckminster Fuller Inc: Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Lars Müller Publishers

The monograph, written by Mark Wigley, offers a deep exploration of the American architect’s work and thought to shed new light on the questions raised by our increasingly electronic world.

 

"Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio" by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller 

 

Lars Müller Publishers have just released a monographic book on Buckminster Fuller, the american architect, inventor and all-twentieth century pioneer, written and edited by Mark Wigley. The book focuses on Fuller’s approach to architecture in the time of radio and the discovery of the new technologies that would change the world forever.

Bucky Inc. offers a deep exploration of Richard Buckminster Fuller’s work and thought to shed new light on the questions raised by our increasingly electronic world. It shows that Fuller’s entire career was a multidimensional reflection on the architecture of radio. He always insisted that the real site of architecture is the electromagnetic spectrum. His buildings were delicate mobile instruments for accessing the invisible universe of overlapping signals. Every detail was understood as a way of tuning into hidden waves. Architecture was built in, with, for and as radio.


 

Practical Information

BUCKMINSTER FULLER INC. Architecture in the Age of Radio
by Mark Wigley
320 pages, approx. 150 images
16,5 x 24 cm, 6 ½ x 9 ½ in
paperback

ISBN 978-3-03778-428-0
English language

EUR 35.00.- USD/CAD 35.00.- GBP 25.00.-

 


Bucky Inc. rethinks the legacy of one of the key protagonists of the twentieth century. It draws extensively on Fuller’s archive to follow his radical thinking from toilets to telepathy, plastic to prosthetics, and data to deep-space. It shows how the critical arguments and material techniques of arguably the single most exposed designer of the last century were overlooked at the time but have become urgently relevant today.

 

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

"Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio" by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

 

MARK WIGLEY

MARK WIGLEY is an architectural historian and theorist based at Columbia University. He is the author of The Architecture of Deconstruction: Derrida’s Haunt; White Walls, Designer Dresses: The Fashioning of Modern Architecture; and Constant’s New Babylon: The Hyper-Architecture of Desire.

He coedited The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond and is the co-founder of the journal Volume. He has curated exhibitions at the MoMA in New York, the Witte de With in Rotterdam, The Drawing Center in New York, and the CCA in Montreal.

 

"Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio" by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

“Buckminster Fuller Inc. Architecture in the Age of Radio” by Mark Wigley. Published by Lars Muller.

 

BUCKMINSTER FULLER

BUCKMINSTER FULLER was an American architect, systems theorist, author, designer and inventor. For half of a century, Fuller developed many ideas, designs and inventions, particularly regarding practical, inexpensive shelter and transportation, the most famous of which being the geodesic domes, which have been used as parts of military radar stations, civic buildings, environmental protest camps and exhibition attractions.

Their construction is based on extending some basic principles to build simple “tensegrity” structures (tetrahedron, octahedron, and the closest packing of spheres), making them lightweight and stable. The geodesic dome was a result of Fuller’s exploration of nature’s constructing principles to find design solutions.

Fuller’s energy-efficient and inexpensive Dymaxion house garnered much interest, but has never been produced. Designed and developed during the mid-1940s, this prototype is a round structure (not a dome), shaped something like the flattened “bell” of certain jellyfish. It has several innovative features, including revolving dresser drawers, and a fine-mist shower that reduces water consumption.


 

News source: Lars Müller Publishers
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