“Atlas of Utopias” at Frac Centre-Val de Loire

Bringing together over 25 major artists and architects from the second half of the 20th century, the exhibition opens onto urban visions that examined the modern city with a particularly critical eye.

 

Flagrant Delit. 1975. Courtesy Architectural Association

 

In 1972, Italian art critic Germano Celant coined the term “radical architecture” to describe Superstudio and the Florentine scene. It spread quickly to apply to other European and American artists and architectures, who, like their Italian counterparts, opened up architecture to artistic and conceptual practices.


 

Practical information

“Superstudio. Life after Architecture”
3 April – 11 September, 2019
Frac Centre
88 Rue du Colombier, Orléans
France

 


Sometimes far removed from any constructive purpose, their projects at all scales intend to shake the certainties of classical modernity and reform the way of thinking about the city and the habitat. Bringing together more than 25 major artists and architects from the second half of the 20th century, the exhibition opens with urban visions – from Constant’s New Babylon to Rem Koolhaas’s New York Delirium – which take a particularly critical look at modern city.

 

Archizoom Associati, No-Stop City, 1969-2001Yona Friedman, Ville spatiale, 1959 Collection Fra

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

 

It is then extended to architectural projects that attempt to redefine the physical and psychic relationships between man and the architectural space. In the center, the white cube welcomes three iconic projects of radical Italian design designed by Ettore Sottsass Jr., Superbox, Archizoom, Letti di Sogno and Riccardo Dalisi, Throne.

 

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

 

Thus radicality appears under the hospice of ritual (Sottsass Jr.) or that of dream and fantasy (Archizoom). Far from being a hymn to progress, the exhibition tries, with tenderness, to show the nostalgia for the imbalances that surround these attempts to go beyond reality. So Bye Bye Utopia, welcome to wander. At times quite removed from any constructive end, their projects, developed at a variety of scales, sought to shake up the certitudes of classic modernity and reform the way cities and housing were understood.

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo

Atlas des utopies © Martin Argyroglo


 

News source: Frac Centre
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