“A Clockwork Jerusalem”, the British Pavilion for this year’s Biennale, at the AA Gallery

Especially designed for the Venice Biennale, the exhibition programmed from May 9 to June 6 in the AA Gallery explores the many faces and the great extent of Britain’s Modernism, combining “traditions of the romantic, sublime and pastoral, as well as interests in technology and science fiction”.

 

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte


The Architectural Association Gallery in London is hosting an exhibition on British Modernism and its many faces: from early pop culture to the garden city utopia, the display attempts to explore how international influences came together with Britain’s very own vision of its future.

Especially designed for the British Pavilion in last year’s Venice Biennale, curated by Rem Koolhaas under the theme of “Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014”, the exhibition, comprising models, media installations and photographs will be displayed in the AA Gallery’s main space from May 9 to June 6, 2015.

 

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte

 

From Stonehenge to council estates, from Ebenezer Howard to Cliff Richard, from ruins and destruction to back-to-the-land rural fantasies, A Clockwork Jerusalem explores how the international influences of modernism became mixed with long standing British sensibilities. Through architecture, records, books and adverts, the exhibition examines how traditions of the romantic, sublime and pastoral, as well as interests in technology and science fiction, were absorbed to create a specifically British form of modernism.

A Clockwork Jerusalem focuses on British modernism at the moment it was at its most ambitious socially, politically and architecturally, but also on the point of collapse. A variety of large scale projects, images, objects and artefacts offer insights into the way architecture was central to manufacturing a new vision of society at a scale inconceivable today. The modern future of Britain was built from an unlikely combination of interests and these projects have changed our physical and imaginative landscapes.

 

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte for the British Council

A Clockwork Jerusalem curated by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians © Cristiano Corte

 

Concept, Curation and Exhibition Design by FAT Architecture and Crimson Architectural Historians. Commissioned by the British Council for the British Pavilion, 14th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia 2014.

In partnership with The Vinyl Factory.

 


 

Practical Information

A clockwork Jerusalem
May  9, 2015 / June 6, 2015

AA Gallery
36 Bedford Square,
London WC1B 3ES

Monday to Friday 10:00–19:00,
Saturday 10:00–15:00.

 


 

Text quoted from the Architectural Association’s main event page.
All images by Cristiano Corte for the British Council.