[Exhibition] “New Museums. Intentions, Expectations, Challenges” at MAH Geneva

May 11, 2017

The exhibition New Museums. Intentions, Expectations, Challenges invites visitors to examine and envision the ways in which museums influence and shape local communities, how they function as interlocutors for societal change and how they carry intentions for the future.

 

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney SANAA © Kazuyo Sejima+Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA (Architect) ; Art Gallery of New South Wales (Client) ; Studio Cyrille Thomas (Rendering)

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, SANAA. © Kazuyo Sejima+Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA (Architect) ; Art Gallery of New South Wales (Client) ; Studio Cyrille Thomas (Rendering)

 

In this exhibition, we consider the “new museum” to refer to the intersection of museology and museum architecture, as the embodiment of what the museum might look like in the future and what its functions will be. After the financial crisis of 2008, it became clear that so-called mega-museums are not necessarily models for success as a certain humility and return to essentials have come to predominate. In addition to well-known iconic mega-buildings, there are many smaller projects devoted to the specific task of redefining what objects of cultural value worthy of preservation might be.


 

Practical information

“New Museums. Intentions, Expectations, Challenges”
May 11 – August 20, 2017
Musées d’art et d’histoire
Rue Charles-Galland, 2  1206 Genève
Switzerland

 


The “new museum” is faced with many challenges. It must meet the public’s expectations and it is required to be a visitor magnet; it has to be a place for ambitious study and conservation of cultural treasures; a reflection of the socio-cultural pulse; an economic attraction hoped to revitalise its urban surroundings; and an iconic landmark. Both innovative and respectful of traditions, the new museum is increasingly expected to be partially or wholly self-supporting rather than relying on state or private funding.

 

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney SANAA © Kazuyo Sejima+Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA (Architect) ; Art Gallery of New South Wales (Client) ; Doug&Wolf (Rendering)

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney SANAA © Kazuyo Sejima+Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA (Architect) ; Art Gallery of New South Wales (Client) ; Doug&Wolf (Rendering)

Guggenheim Helsinki Moreau Kusunoki Architectes © Moreau Kusunoki

Guggenheim Helsinki, Moreau Kusunoki Architectes, © Moreau Kusunoki

 

CULTURAL HERITAGE

Museums play a pivotal role in our society because they shelter and safeguard our heritage and contribute to the re-telling of our history. Formerly regarded as a mere locus of knowledge, today in the Internet Age the museum is being re-defined as a social space and a space for experience and exchange.

 

China Comic and Animation Museum, Hangzhou Library MVRDV © MVRDV

China Comic and Animation Museum, Hangzhou, Library MVRDV © MVRDV

China Comic and Animation Museum, Hangzhou Birdseye MVRDV © MVRDV

China Comic and Animation Museum, Hangzhou, Birdseye, MVRDV © MVRDV

 

China Comic and Animation Museum, Hangzhou, China, MVRDV, Rotterdam. National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) Washington, D.C., USA, Adjaye Associates, New York/London. The Palestinian Museum, Birzeit, West Bank, Palestine, Heneghan Peng Architects, Dublin. Kurdistan Museum, Erbil, Iraq, Studio Libeskind, New York. Naga Site Museum, Naga, Sudan, David Chipperfield Architects Berlin.

 

National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington DC Adjaye Associates © Alan Karchmer

National Museum of African American History and Culture, Washington DC Adjaye Associates © Alan Karchmer

Naga Site Museum David Chipperfield Architects © David Chipperfield Architects

Naga Site Museum David Chipperfield Architects © David Chipperfield Architects

URBANISM

Often located at the heart of cities, museums act as symbols, sometimes even iconic landmarks. Simultaneously, modern buildings also seek to establish continuity with their immediate environment and they engage with the city through the design of spaces adjacent to or within the building, where visitors’ paths converge and informal encounters can occur, ideally as part of daily life.

 

Kunstmuseum Basel, nouveau bâtiment Christ & Gantenbein © Walter Mair

Kunstmuseum Basel, nouveau bâtiment Christ & Gantenbein © Walter Mair

Pingtan Art Museum MAD Architects © MAD Architects

Pingtan Art Museum MAD Architects © MAD Architects

Sydney Modern Project – Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, SANAA, Tokyo. Kunstmuseum Basel Extension, Basel, Switzerland, Christ & Gantenbein, Basel. Pingtan Art Museum, Pingtan Island, China, MAD Architects, Beijing.

PRIVATE PUBLIC MUSEUMS
Over the centuries, museums shifted from the private into the public realm, and today museums are, mostly regarded as public institutions for the benefit of all. In the last decades, more and more private museums opened. They are often criticised for furthering personal agendas instead of being institutions ostensibly created for the good of society, although this increasing degree of privatisation is giving rise to audacity and to new ideas on how future museums could function.

 

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town Heatherwick Studio © Heatherwick Studio

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town Heatherwick Studio © Heatherwick Studio

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town Heatherwick Studio © Heatherwick Studio

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town Heatherwick Studio © Heatherwick Studio

 

 

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA), Cape Town, South Africa, Heatherwick Studio, London. Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai, China, Atelier Deshaus, Shanghai. Genesis Museum, Beijing, China, Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Osaka.

 

Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai Atelier Deshaus © Xia Zhi

Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai Atelier Deshaus © Xia Zhi

Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai Atelier Deshaus © Xia Zhi

Long Museum West Bund, Shanghai Atelier Deshaus © Xia Zhi

 

MUSEUMS AS COMMERCIAL ENTITIES
After the “Bilbao effect” heralded by the opening of Guggenheim museum, large museums seemed to have realised that there lies great economic value behind their names, and satellite museums, which draw from the collection, reputation and know-how of the mother institution, are being exported all over the world. As a stream of revenue for under-financed institutions, this strategy also leads to questions of distribution of art and culture.

Guggenheim Helsinki Helsinki, Finland Moreau Kusunoki Architectes, Paris.

RE-DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL CLUSTERS

The deliberate placement of a museum building into formerly unspectacular areas is intended to revive a neighbourhood, a city or an entire region economically and culturally. The development of cultural clusters (including museums but also theatres, libraries, etc.) is a frequently used strategy. These clusters are conceived as a stimulus for touristic and economic growth and can even have a major social impact.

 

Munchmuseet, Oslo Estudio Herreros © MIR

Munchmuseet, Oslo Estudio Herreros © MIR

Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design, Oslo Klaus Schuwerk, Kleihues + Schuwerk Gesellschaft von Architecten © Kleihues + Schuwerk, MIR

Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design, Oslo Klaus Schuwerk, Kleihues + Schuwerk Gesellschaft von Architecten © Kleihues + Schuwerk, MIR

Plateforme10, Lausanne, Switzerland, mcb-a:, Barozzi/Veiga, Barcelona. mudac & Musée de l’Elysée: Manuel Aires Mateus and Francisco Aires Mateus, Lisbon. Munchmuseet, Oslo, Norway, estudio Herreros, Madrid. Nasjonalmuseet for kunst, arkitektur og design, Oslo, Norway, Klaus Schuwerk, Kleihues + Schuwerk Architects, Naples.

 

Plateforme10, mudac et Musée de l'Élysée, Lausanne Aires Mateus e Associados © Aires Mateus

Plateforme10, mudac et Musée de l’Élysée, Lausanne, Aires Mateus e Associados © Aires Mateus

Plateforme10, mudac et Musée de l'Élysée, Lausanne Aires Mateus e Associados © Aires Mateus

Plateforme10, mudac et Musée de l’Élysée, Lausanne Aires Mateus e Associados © Aires Mateus


 

News source: MAH Geneva
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