“Building Site” exhibition at Lisbon Architecture Triennale

October 27, 2016

One of the four main exhibitions of the 2016 Lisbon Triennale, “Building Site” allows for cross-readings on issues generated by building sites, inviting the viewer to reflect on the transformations in contemporary building sites, the challenges they face and the impact they have on the practice of architecture.

 

Casa da Música, Model on the building site, December 2001 © Casa da Música

Casa da Música, Model on the building site, December 2001 © Casa da Música

 

Just as the forms of architecture determine the organization of building sites, so technology and economy organize methods of production – with a significant social impact. These conditions constrict and stimulate architectural  conception. From the communication between design and construction, the organization of time and money, to the rhetoric of politics and technological innovations, all the cards for architecture-to-be are played on the building site.


 

Practical information

“Building Site”
October 5 – December 11, 2016
Curator: André Tavares
Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation Lower Gallery
Av. de Berna 45 Lisbon
Portugal

 


The work of the architect serves as a counterbalance to the client’s anxiety in relation to many  factors, including the need to match building deadlines and cost optimisation with quality standards. In a building project many diverse interests require negotiation and the role of architecture unfolds as projects become  buildings.

 

Casa da Música, 2004 © Gabriele Basilico

Casa da Música, 2004 © Gabriele Basilico

Casa da Música, Model, c. 1999 © OMA

Casa da Música, Model, c. 1999 © OMA

 

The exhibition is organized into modules, which serve as anchors for exploring different approaches.Presented in partnership with the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), one of the modules draws from the professional archives of Cedric Price. It focuses on a report he produced in the 1970s aimed at improving work conditions on building sites.

 

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

 

Another example – presented in partnership with the Cité de l’Architecture & du Patrimoine – takes a look at the entrepreneurial strategy of François Hennebique who, in the late nineteenth century, mastered construction in reinforced concrete and paved the way for the concentration of technical knowledge in the field.

 

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

Cedric Price, McAppy Report, 1973–1975. Portable Enclosures Program, model, 1973. Cedric Price fonds, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal © CCA

 

In the other modules different perspectives are presented: Usina, an architectural collective  that  fosters self-help housing developements in the Brazilian megalopolis of Sao Paulo; the process leading to the construction of OMA’s Casa da Música, addressing the role of time in construction; the example of the project for the reconstruction of the Neues Museum in Berlin by David Chipperfield Architects, looking specifically at the communication unfolding between the various actors involved; the young architectural practice Skrei and their approach to material qualities; and finally a view upon the coldwar choreographies generated to serve as a stage for US and USSR heavy pre-fabricated steel and concrete panel construction.

 

David Chipperfield Architects, Neues Museum, Berlin, 1997-2009. Roman Gallery showing the situation during rebuilding © Jörg von Bruchhausen

David Chipperfield Architects, Neues Museum, Berlin, 1997-2009. Roman Gallery showing the situation during rebuilding © Jörg von Bruchhausen

Neues Museum, Berlin, 1997-2009. David Chipperfield Architects. Ceiling plan for the restoration of Roman Gallery, print with hand annotations, scale 1:20, June 2006 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Given by David Chipperfield Architects

Neues Museum, Berlin, 1997-2009. David Chipperfield Architects. Ceiling plan for the restoration of Roman Gallery, print with hand annotations, scale 1:20, June 2006 © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Given by David Chipperfield Architects

 

ABOUT THE TRIENNALE

The Lisbon Architecture Triennale is a non-profit association whose mission is to examine, foster and promote architectural thinking and practice. It holds a major forum every three years for the debate, discussion and dissemination of architecture across geographic and disciplinary boundaries. In addition to this main periodic appointment, the Triennale organizes conferences and events all year round, such as Open House Lisboa, an event that for one weekend each year opens the doors to the best architecture in the cities.

 

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

"Building site" Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova

“Building site” Installation-shot © Tiago Casanova


 

News source: 2016 Lisbon Triennale
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