‘Art of Many and The Right to Space’ the Biennale’s Danish Pavilion exhibition at DAC Copenhagen

August 10, 2017

With more than 130 architectural models, the exhibition fills DAC from basement to attic, giving visitors a fascinating insight into what makes Danish architecture unique and so popular abroad.

 

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

 

The Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) will be showing from 7 July to 1 October ‘Art of Many and The Right to Space’, the Danish contribution to the most recent Venice Biennale of Architecture.

The Biennale is the most prestigious architecture event in the world, and countries from around the globe exhibit their own interpretations of a specific theme. While the Biennale attracts international visitors, the exhibition at DAC opens to a Danish audience, who will undoubtedly recognise the libraries, hospitals and childcare centres from their daily lives. The exhibition also provides fresh insights into what makes these buildings special.


 

Practical Information

Art of Many and The Right to Space
7 July – 1 October, 2017
Danish Architecture Center
Strandgade 27B, Copenhagen
Denmark

 


 Art of Many and The Right to Space spotlights how Danish architects, in collaboration with planners, policy-makers and developers, work every day to renew the Danish tradition of designing and building a society and social institutions that put people first.

Architecture in Denmark consists of more than architectural beacons and prestigious projects for the few or standardised, prefabricated buildings for the masses. Danish architects help to create urban spaces, hospitals, social housing, educational institutions, childcare centres, workplaces and more for the benefit of society as a whole, while creating new spatial interpretations of our Danish democracy and society.

 

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

 

The exhibition is curated by architect Boris Brorman Jensen and philosopher Kristoffer Lindhardt Weiss.

“With this exhibition, we want to show that Danish architects continuously fight small battles every single day to raise the bar for good architecture, thereby improving quality of life for the Danish population in general. They do so by constantly challenging themselves and their surroundings and by not just fulfilling their brief, but bettering it. In Denmark, architects make their mark by insisting on pushing the boundaries for what is possible in almost every single project,” explain Boris Brorman Jensen and Kristoffer Lindhardt.

 

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

 

The exhibition also gives voice to one of the great advocates of humanistic architecture, Professor Jan Gehl, in a major video installation. For 50 years, Gehl’s work as a critic and an advocate of putting people first has been at the heart of the discourse on the right to space in the city. Jan Gehl has helped to put humanism on the agenda outside Denmark as well, with projects in New York, Moscow, Sydney and London, among others.

 

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

 

The many projects featured in the exhibition are grouped into five different agendas. Each agenda is introduced by the curators in a video.

1. Beyond Luxury
Affluence and consumption are closely related and both contribute to depletion of the world’s limited resources. Architecture needs to redefine luxury to ensure sustainable quality of life in the 21st century.

2. Designing Life
Shaping human behaviour is in architecture’s DNA. From densely populated cities to childcare centres, architects and planners are exploring how architecture affects our lives.

3. Claiming Space
Having generous public spaces is not an extravagance. Creating space for public life where there is none is about putting people first and pursuing the ideal of an open society.

4. Exit Utopia
The ideology of modernism aspired to complete control of both society and nature. It failed. Today, the future is shaped by new alliances between people, structures and nature.

5. Pro Community
When people organise and demand influence, they set the world in motion. The future is shaped by strong communities.

 

'Art of the Many and the Right to Space'  exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ exhibition © Danish Architecture Center

 

During the exhibition, the Danish Architecture Centre invites you inside some of the structures on show. At our on-site visits, the architects behind the buildings provide exclusive insights into the principles and concepts upon which the projects are founded.

The Danish Architecture Centre has been appointed by the Ministry of Culture Denmark as commissioner of the official Danish submission at the 15th International Venice Biennale of Architecture. The project is sponsored by Realdania, the Ministry of Culture Denmark and the Danish Arts Foundation Committee for Architecture Grants and Project Funding.

 

Danish Pavilion 'Art of the Many and the Right to Space' curators  © Danish Architecture Center

Danish Pavilion ‘Art of the Many and the Right to Space’ curators © Danish Architecture Center

 

The exhibition was developed in close collaboration with the Danish Arts Foundation Committee for Architecture Grants and Project Funding. It was curated by Boris Brorman Jensen and Kristoffer Lindhardt Weiss, and funded by Realdania.


 

News source: Danish Architecture Center
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