“Plečnik’s Ljubljana” visiting exhibition at COAM Madrid

March 31, 2017

The so-called “Plečnik Year” 2017 starts off with “Plečnik’s Ljubljana”, an exhibition in Madrid showing the architect’s unique works in Prague, Vienna and Ljubljana. The exhibition will travel across various European cities, among which will also be the Czech capital in September, during the “Days of Ljubljana” in Prague.

 

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Part of the exterior of the Churc of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Prague, 1928-1932.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Part of the exterior of the Churc of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Prague, 1928-1932.

The exhibition Plečnik’s Ljubljana is a collaboration between the Museum and Galleries of Ljubljana (MGML) and the Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO), created by an initiative of the Slovenian Ministry of Culture. Part of the Plečnik Year 2017, the exhibition will present the maestro’s architecture across European cities. Its first stop, from 7 March to 27 April, is the Spanish capital of Madrid.

 

Practical information

“Plečnik’s Ljubljana”
March 7 – April 27. 2017
LaSede COAM, First Floor
C/ Hortaleza 63,
28004 Madrid

 


For the commemoration of the Plečnik Year 2017 the Embassy of Slovenia in Madrid, in collaboration with the Slovenian Ministry of Culture, Austrian Cultural Forum and the Czech Cultural Centre, is opening the exhibition Plečnik (1872–1957): Architect of Ljubljana, Prague and Vienna. The exhibition, which presents the masterful works of Plečnik in Ljubljana, Prague and Vienna, is on view between 7 March and 27 April at the architectural college of Madrid (Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid, COAM, C/ Hortaleza 63, Madrid). Its curators Natalija Lapajne, MAO, and Ana Porok, MGML, prepared a well-rounded presentation of Plečnik’s Ljubljana.
Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Three bridges.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Three bridges.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Church of St Michael in Crna Vas, Ljubljana, 1937-1938.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Church of St Michael in Crna Vas, Ljubljana, 1937-1938.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

Curators Ana Porok and Natalija Lapajne wrote in the exhibition’s introduction:
In 2017 we are celebrating the Plečnik year to commemorate the 145th anniversary of the birth and the 60th anniversary of the death of the architect Jože Plečnik. However, our recognition and valuation of his creations is not limited solely to a moment in time and space because his work touches the very universality and timelessness recognisable to all attentive observers. Characterized by the remains of the Roman period and particularly by Baroque style architecture, Ljubljana received its first modern urban plan, a work of Plečnik’s contemporary Max Fabiani, after the earthquake of 1895. From being a sleepy provincial town, it transformed into a modern Art-Noveau-style capital displaying new aesthetic ideals. It took Plečnik nearly three decades to put his vision of Ljubljana into reality. Faced with an already built up space, he redesigned and upgraded it, and between 1921 and 1957 he filled its city grid with a number of impressive buildings.

 

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957) . Obelisk on the moravian Bastion, Prague castle, 1922-1923

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957) . Obelisk on the moravian Bastion, Prague castle, 1922-1923

 

The National and University Library, the Garden of All Saints – Žale, the St. Francis Church in Šiška, and the Ljubljanica bridges are some of his most important interventions within the city. The land axis leading from his house in Trnovo to the Congress Square and the Zvezda Park in the city center represents the city’s cultural avenue. The water axis comprises the arrangement of the Ljubljanica basin, starting with the Trnovski pristan embankment, continuing with the Ljubljanica embankments in the city centre, the Cobbler’s Bridge, the Triple Bridge and Central marketplace, and ending with the sluices. With his arrangement of the embankments and bridges, placing of trees and other vegetation, which he understood as a means of architecture, Plečnik infused Ljubljana with a Mediterranean spirit. His third city axis connects the Jakopič Promenade in Tivoli Park with the Ljubljana Castle on the hill. A special and sacred place is the Garden of All Saints, part of the Žale Cemetary where Plečnik, with extraordinary sensibility and veneration, honoured the citizens of Ljubljana. The architect has transformed the capital so much that we now see it as “Plečnik’s Ljubljana”, a singular urban phenomenon and a comprehensive artwork of the 20th century.

 

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). The Parliament of slovenia, model, 1949.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). The Parliament of slovenia, model, 1949.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Staircase of the Langer Apartment House in Vienna, 1901-1902.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Staircase of the Langer Apartment House in Vienna, 1901-1902.

 

Simultaneously with the Slovenian capital Plečnik also worked in Prague, where he made interventions in parts of the Prague Castle for the then president Masaryk and built the Church of the Most Sacred Heart of Our Lord, works which inspired many Czech architects. Numerous ideas were born, reciprocally multiplied, diversified and realised in one of the capitals. A joint effort of Slovenia and the Czech Republic for the international renown of the architect is now focused in the nomination project for the inscription of his works on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

 

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Church os st Francis in Ljubljana, 1925-1927.

Jože Plečnik (1872-1957). Church os st Francis in Ljubljana, 1925-1927.

 

Independent from contemporary architectural styles of the early 20th century, especially of the reigning modernism, Plečnik was able to develop his unique architectural language. His unique approach to the reinterpretation of architectural heritage and an extraordinarily rich symbolism contain elements of timeless architecture. With his approach he upgraded and reinterpreted space, while he modernised it and looked for new usages of its traditional function. His architecture offers universal solutions for key questions in different generations, which makes his works perennial.


 

News source: COAM
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“Olafur Eliasson: Green light – An artistic workshop” at The National Gallery in Prague

March 29, 2017

This unique project of the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson will be presented in Prague for the first time. Creator of monumental installations in London’s Tate Modern and in the Museum of Vienna, he works with light and tries to attract our attention to the migration crisis and the unstable situation in some countries today.

 

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

 

The National Gallery in Prague will present Olafur Eliasson: Green light – An artistic workshop as part of its GRAND OPENING program. The presentation will consist of a small-scale iteration of the artistic workshop that took place at TBA21–Augarten, Vienna, and will be led by former Green light participants. If we imagine the green light as a metaphor of the hand we give to immigrants, we can start the process of the worlds Transformation. The exhibition will have a form of little manufacture where it will be possible to buy the lights to support the platform Green Light- Shared Learning.


 

Practical information

“Olafur Eliasson: Green light – An artistic workshop”
March 17 – April 4, 2017
The National Gallery, Veletržní palác
Dukelských hrdinů 47, Prague
Czech Republic

 


Initiated by the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson in collaboration with Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA21) in Vienna, Austria, Green light – An artistic workshop responds to a situation of social transformation, displacement, and migration.

 

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

 

Through the communal fabrication of Green light lamps and an educational program based on shared learning principles, the project constitutes a dynamic space that elicits various forms of participation and engagement. Conceived by Eliasson as a metaphorical green light for refugees and migrants, Green light testifies to the agency of contemporary art and its potential to initiate processes of civic transformation.

 

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

 

Green light is an act of welcoming, addressed both to those who have fled hardship and instability in their home countries and to the residents of the cities receiving them. Working together in a playful creative process, participants build a modular light and construct a communal environment in which difference is not only accepted but embraced. I hope Green light shines light on some of the challenges and responsibilities arising from the current refugee crisis in Europe and throughout the world.”  – Olafur Eliasson

 

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

 

Both pre-assembled and flat-packed Green light lamps will be available on site for a donation of €300. All proceeds from the project go to supporting the Green light–Shared Learning platform and TBA21’s partner organizations Red Cross Vienna, Caritas and Georg Danzer Haus in Vienna, Austria. Venue: Mezzanine above NG Bookshop – Koenig Books.

 

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

"Green light An artistic workshop" at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson

“Green light An artistic workshop” at National Gallery in Prague © Olafur Eliasson


 

News source: National Gallery Prague
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“Álvaro Siza Vieira: Visions of the Alhambra” at Serralves Museum

March 27, 2017

The exhibition consists of several original sketches for the project of the New Gate of the Alhambra by the architect who also received the prestigious Pritzker Prize in 1992. In addition the exhibition will display models, executive drawings, an installation as reference to the Alhambra, photographs and interviews that will bring the Berlin audience closer to the Alhambra New Gate project.

 

"Álvaro Siza Vieira: Visions of the Alhambra" © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

“Álvaro Siza Vieira: Visions of the Alhambra” © Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

 

Álvaro Siza Vieira is perhaps the most poetic and rigorous master of contemporary architecture. His imagination was first captivated by the Alhambra in the 1940s, during family travels, that engendered his seminal introductions to architecture. His visits to Granada later multiplied, and in 1984, when it was classified as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Siza also rose to international recognition and started winning numerous awards. In 2011, Álvaro Siza and Juan Domingo Santos won the “Alhambra Atrium” International Ideas Contest, with their project that proposed a “New Gate” for the 21st century, which symbolises, in continuity, all the entrances to this acropolis, of timeless modernity. (more…)

“Stages, banks, hangars” Frankfurt Projects by Otto Apel\ABB at DAM

March 27, 2017

Deutsches Architekturmuseum in Frankfurt am Main (DAM) is devoting an exhibition to the architectural office ABB, founded in 1961 by Otto Apel, Hansgeorg Beckert and Gilbert Becker: “Stages, Banks, Aircraft Games – Frankfurter Projekte by Otto Apel / ABB Architects”.

 

ABB, Lufthansa-Wartungshalle V, Frankfurt am Main \ 1972 Foto: Ulfert Beckert

ABB, Lufthansa-Wartungshalle V, Frankfurt am Main \ 1972 Foto: Ulfert Beckert

 

Frankfurt’s buildings from the 1950s to the 1970s are shown in more than 500 historical photographs of the photographer Ulfert Beckert, brother of the architect Hannsgeorg Beckert, supplemented by new photographs by the artist Eike Laeuen. (more…)

Jean-Christophe Quinton exhibition at La Galerie d’Architecture

March 25, 2017

The exhibition, entitled “Vers l’immédiate étrangeté des formes” (Towards the immediate strangeness of forms) shares his architectural projects culture from the last fifteen years of architectural experimentation within Jean-Christophe Quinton’s office.

 

"Vers l’immédiate étrangeté des formes" © Jean-Christophe Quinton Architecte

“Vers l’immédiate étrangeté des formes” © Jean-Christophe Quinton Architecte

 

Every architect develops a unique culture, the product of the tension between a general culture shared by all architects and a project culture specific to each. The project culture’s most important effect is to liberate the architect from set expressions, from stereotypical and conventional thought, and thereby open the way for a personal approach to design. The project culture shapes this approach, provides a bulwark against preconceptions, against modish influences, and allows the architect to develop his or her conceptual independence and a personal set of tools. (more…)

“The Japanese House. Architecture & Life after 1945″ at the Barbican Centre

March 24, 2017

Featuring over 40 architects from renowned masters and contemporary architects to exciting figures little known outside of Japan, the exhibition celebrates some of the most ground-breaking architectural projects of the last 70 years.

 

Toyo Ito. Silver Hut, 1984 © Tomio Ohashi

Toyo Ito. Silver Hut, 1984 © Tomio Ohashi

 

The Japanese House: Architecture and Life after 1945 is the first major UK exhibition to focus on Japanese domestic architecture from the end of the Second World War to now, a field which has consistently produced some of the most influential and extraordinary examples of modern and contemporary design.

(more…)

“Imagine Moscow: Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution” at the Design Museum

March 23, 2017

The exhibition explores six unbuilt architectural landmarks in Moscow from the 1920s and 1930s following the Russian Revolution, featuring projects including the Palace of the Soviets, planned to be the world’s tallest building, and Cloud Iron, a network of horizontal skyscrapers 

 

Valentina Kulagina, Front cover design by Valentina Kulagina entitled 1st of May in ‘Krasnaya niva’ magazine, 1930 © Ne boltai! Collection

Valentina Kulagina, Front cover design by Valentina Kulagina entitled 1st of May in ‘Krasnaya niva’ magazine, 1930 © Ne boltai! Collection

 

Marking the centenary of the Russian Revolution, “Imagine Moscow: Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution” explores Moscow as it was envisioned by a bold generation of architects in the 1920s and early 1930s. Featuring rarely seen material, the exhibition outlines an idealistic vision of the Soviet capital that was never realised. (more…)

“Frederick Kiesler: Architect, Artist, Visionary” at Martin-Gropius-Bau Berlin

March 22, 2017

Martin-Gropius-Bau is devoting an exhibition to the universal artist Frederick Kiesler, whose complex oeuvre is presented in all its facets for the first time in Germany. Central projects, important artistic friendships and collective works illustrate his importance in 20th-century architecture and art history and map out his environment.

 

 Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema, Screen-o-Scope, New York 1929 Photo: Ruth Bernhard, reproduced with permission of the Ruth Bernhard Archive, Princeton University Art Museum © Trustees of Princeton University

Frederick Kiesler, Film Guild Cinema, Screen-o-Scope, New York 1929. Photo: Ruth Bernhard, reproduced with permission of the Ruth Bernhard, Archive, Princeton University Art Museum © Trustees of Princeton University

 

Frederick Kiesler, born 1890 in Czernowitz (Chernivtsi), died 1965 in New York, was an Austro-American architect, stage designer, designer, artist and theoretician. His artistic approach blurring boundaries between individual artistic genres, his concept of an endlessly flowing space and his holistic theory of design Correalism belong to the greatest visions of the 20th century and enjoy undiminished topicality. Over and above this, Kiesler was a central figure in the network of New York’s aesthetic community, and his circle of friends reads like a Who-is-Who of the avant-garde. (more…)

“Pier Luigi Nervi, the model as a tool of design and construction” at Politecnico di Milano

March 20, 2017

This exhibition brings together three recent experiences on the question of the “model” as a tool of representation of architecture, to share and compare recent studies around this theme.

 

Pier Luigi Nervi, Palazzetto © Pier Luigi Nervi

Pier Luigi Nervi, Palazzetto © Pier Luigi Nervi

 

The show is part of the research in progress in Italian and European polytechnic schools, which by examining exemplary works like those of Pier Luigi Nervi has triggered a substantial rethinking of the relationships between the disciplines of engineering and architecture in the field of tools and techniques of design and construction. (more…)

“Peter Märkli” exhibition of drawings and models at Betts Project

March 18, 2017

Betts Project is delighted to present a selling exhibition of renowned Swiss architect Peter Märkli, alongside relief-sketches by the sculptor Hans Josephsohn. This will be the artist’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, showing works –from his famous ‘Language drawings’ to 3D drawings and models– that are related to selected projects.

 

"Peter Märkli" exhibition view © Betts Project

“Peter Märkli” exhibition view © Betts Project

 

‘The sketch is the germ of an idea, with no detail in it. The sketch has to be kept small, otherwise you’d have to flesh out certain details. It’s like a writer coming up with an idea for a novel. He might be clear that there will be three main characters, but he doesn’t yet know how the plot will unfold. (more…)