“Sir Peter Cook’s 80 Ideas at 80 Years ” exhibition by the visionary architect at The Bartlett School of Architecture

February 27, 2017

The exhibition, 80 at 80, features work from the full span of the career of Sir Peter Cook, a major figure in 20th century architecture and a key figure at The Bartlett. Sir Peter, who recently celebrated his 80th birthday, was Chair of The Bartlett from 1990 to 2015, and is still an active lecturer and critic at the school.

 

Plug-in City / Archigram. Image © Peter Cook

Plug-in City / Archigram. Image © Peter Cook

 

The Bartlett School of Architecture at UCL has a lot to celebrate this year. It is the 175th anniversary of the School, which ranks second in the world; and it is also celebrating its return to its 22 Gordon Street home, in the heart of Bloomsbury, after a multi-million pound refurbishment. (more…)

“Cedric Price Works 1952–2003: A Forward-Minded Retrospective” celebrating Cedric Price’s illustrious career

February 25, 2017

“Cedric Price Works 1952–2003: A Forward-Minded Retrospective”, written and edited by Samantha Hardingham, is a two-volume anthology bringing together for the first time all of the projects, articles and talks by British architect Cedric Price.

 

Perspective view of Madeley Transfer area, Potteries Thinkbelt, 1963–66 © Canadian Centre for Architecture

Perspective view of Madeley Transfer area, Potteries Thinkbelt, 1963–66 © Canadian Centre for Architecture

 

Co-published by the Architectural Association (AA) and the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), the publication celebrates Price’s illustrious career as an influential thinker, philosopher, teacher and architect.

A student at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in the 1950s, Price established his office in London (1960), going on to produce some of the most intensely imaginative and experimental architectural projects of the latter half of the 20th Century, including one of his very few built projects, the Aviary at London Zoo (1960-65) with The Earl of Snowdon and Frank Newby. (more…)

“Savage Architecture. Gian Piero Frassinelli, Superstudio and 2A+P/A” at Politecnico di Milano

February 23, 2017

The exhibition is an opportunity to examine the important role that Frassinelli played within Superstudio, to discuss the trans-disciplinary influence that the Florentine collective has had in the last fifty years and speculate about its operative potential today.

 

Gian Piero Frassinelli and 2A+P/A - Central Archive of Human Cultures, Excursion in the Archive, 2015

Gian Piero Frassinelli and 2A+P/A – Central Archive of Human Cultures, Excursion in the Archive, 2015

 

The 8th of February 2017 the project Savage Architecture was presented in the Exhibition Space Guido Nardi of the Polytechnic of Milan. In the form of an exhibition and a book, curated by Davide Sacconi, the project portraits the research developed by Gian Piero Frassinelli – former member of Superstudio – and his recent collaboration with 2A+P/A which explore the intersection between architecture and anthropology. (more…)

“Modelling for the camera. Photography of architectural models in Spain, 1925–1970″ at ICO Madrid

February 23, 2017

Through this exhibition, Museo ICO focuses on, for the very first time in Spain, the role of models and the photography thereof in the creation of the image of architectural modernity in Spain.

 

Sede de los Laboratorios JORBA, Madrid, 1965. Miguel Fisac Serna. Fotografía © C. Jiménez. Imagen cortesía de La Fábrica

Sede de los Laboratorios JORBA, Madrid, 1965. Miguel Fisac Serna. Fotografía © C. Jiménez. Imagen cortesía de La Fábrica

 

The exhibition features 138 photographs, 14 albums and contact sheets, 20 magazines, 13 models and one projection, for the large part, all specimens are originals that reflect on modern architecture. The photographs were taken by around 35 photographers over more than four decades. Francesc Català-Roca, Kindel, Pando, Luis Lladó, Oriol Maspons-Julio Ubiña, Francisco Gómez, are just a few of the photographers on show at this exhibition.

Their cameras captured the models used for the most noteworthy architectural projects in modern history, and other less known projects, undertaken by the best Spanish architects of the mid- 20th century, such as Josep Lluís Sert, Miguel Fisac, José Antonio Coderch, Francisco de Asís Cabrero, Javier Carvajal, Alejandro de la Sota and Fernando Higueras. 
(more…)

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” model exhibition at The Lighthouse

February 22, 2017

The models on show represent a selection of architectural designs by Mackintosh —they were competition entries run by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Glasgow International Exhibition at Kelvingrove Park respectively. Although they received notable media attention, none of these plans were selected as winning designs.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

The wonderful Unbuilt Mackintosh Models are currently resident in the Review Gallery at  The Lighthouse, Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture. This is the first time in over a year all models have been displayed together! See them here until 31 March 2017.


 

Practical information

“Unbuilt Mackintosh”
February 7 -March 31, 2017
The Lighthouse
11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow
Scotland

 


The models on show represent a selection of architectural designs by Mackintosh himself. They were competition entries run by the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Glasgow International Exhibition at Kelvingrove Park respectively. Although they received notable media attention, none of these plans were selected as winning designs.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

In Glasgow you can visit The House for an Art Lover, a building designed by Mackintosh with his wife, Margaret McDonald in 1901, yet not built until 1989.Mackintosh approached his architectural drawings like an artist would a canvas. He used watercolour to suggest colour-ways, as well as using pen and ink to note the dimensions, plans and elevations of the building. While we cannot be one-hundred percent sure of what these less than precise drawings illustrated, there are enough existing buildings by Mackintosh to give a good indication. The two-dimensional drawings offer the modern designer or architect a starting point to respond to, but many of the decisions around materials, proportions, and finish are still open to interpretation.

 

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

"Unbuilt Mackintosh" exhibition model © The  Lighthouse

“Unbuilt Mackintosh” exhibition model © The Lighthouse

 

These models have been interpreted and built by Cemal Ozturk of Ozturk Modelmakers in Glasgow. Their precise dimensions meticulously drawn from what drawings and documentations were available. The choice of building materials for the models have been chosen, not so much for their ability to realistically interpret the proposed building, but for their precision and ability to highlight the detailing and style of the designs. These buildings are thoroughly modern interpretations of the originals and offer visitors new ways of looking and understanding the prolific work of Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

 

Three-quarters view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright

Three-quarters view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright

Bird’s-eye view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Bird’s-eye view of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Look through the roof of the trainshed of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

Look through the roof of the trainshed of the Railway Terminus, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Model by Ozturk, part of the Unbuilt Mackintosh Exhibition at The Lighthouse, Glasgow. By Daniel Wright.

The acquisition has been made possible by the generous support of The Mackintosh Heritage Trust and Creative Scotland.


 

 

News source and text: The Lighthouse
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“Designing the Surface” at Het Nieuwe Instituut Rotterdam

February 21, 2017

The exhibition presents the first results of a long-term research project by the Research and Development department at Het Nieuwe Instituut with partners in the Netherlands and abroad. Architecture of Appropriation is on show from 27 January until 25 June 2017.

 

Designing The Surface Overview, 2017 © Johannes Schwartz

Designing The Surface Overview, 2017 © Johannes Schwartz

 

What determines a product’s appeal, function and identity? Increasingly it is the finish that designers employ not only to beautify a product, but also to strengthen, preserve or disguise it. The last layer can simulate ageing, form an impenetrable shell or function as a convincing imitation of craftsmanship. Designing the Surface, an exhibition where the final topcoat targets the senses, investigates a compendium of artefacts over five sets: lustre, patina, faux, teflon and agency. Surfaces are full of contradictions; declarations of falsehood and denials. Chairs lie. Dashboards deceive. Take a look into the transformation of products – trying to survive in the design world, where nothing is what is seems. (more…)

The world of M.C. Escher now showing in the halls of Palacio de Gaviria

February 17, 2017

The present exhibition aims to help understand the creative universe of this artist who did not hesitate to resort to the most diverse languages, bringing them together in a unique and intriguing artistic journey of geometric discovery.

Regular Division II, Maurits Cornelius Escher © 2017 The M.C. Escher Company. All rights reserved www.mcescher.com

Regular Division II, Maurits Cornelius Escher © 2017 The M.C. Escher Company. All rights reserved www.mcescher.com

 

The Palacio de Gaviria in Madrid reopens after a radical transformation to host an exhibition on Maurits Cornelius Escher. The building, which has until now been used as one of the capital city’s most popular nightclubs, has been adapted by the Italian Arthemisia group to become a new reference point for cultural affairs.

The exhibition is a comprehensive retrospective on the Swiss artist’s work, known for his ability to bring together nature, science, mathematics and optical illusions into beautiful wood and metal engravings. (more…)

Lyonel Feininger retrospective at Fundación Juan March

February 16, 2017

The exhibition offers a complete survey of the career of this German-American artist, Bauhaus teacher and key figure in the context of the artistic avant-gardes.

 

Feininger, Lyonel (1951) Lunar Web  © Fundación Juan March

Feininger, Lyonel (1951) Lunar Web © Fundación Juan March

 

From February 17, the Fundación Juan March presents a retrospective on Lyonel Feininger, the German-American artist from the early twentieth century, in its gallery space in Madrid. The exhibition, named Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956), continues the Juan March’s long-established strategy of presenting insufficiently explored artists, periods and aspects of modern culture, can be described as a “concentrated retrospective” of the artist’s work.


 

Practical information 

“Lyonel Feininger (1871 – 1956)”
February 17 – May 28, 2017
Fundación Juan March. Sede Madrid
Calle de Castelló, 77 Madrid
Spain

 


Nearly 400 works from public and private collections in Europe and the United States will be used to construct a survey of Feininger’s artistic activities, articulated around the different media in which he worked (drawing, graphic work, painting, photography and toy-making) and the principal themes within his oeuvre: caricature and satirical drawings; key places that inspired him, including Paris, Deep, Halle, Gelmeroda and Manhattan; and his recurring interest in bridges, towers, sea views and urban life.

 

Andreas feininger, Gelmeroda VIII, 1921. Whitney Museum of American Art, Nueva York. © Whitney Museum, N.Y.

Andreas feininger, Gelmeroda VIII, 1921. Whitney Museum of American Art, Nueva York. © Whitney Museum, N.Y.

 

The catalogue that accompanies the exhibition will be the first monograph on Feininger in Spanish, with essays and texts by some of the most reputed experts on his work, including Wolfgang Büche, Ulrich Luckhardt, Maurizio Scudiero, Heinz Widauer, Peter Selz, Achim Moeller, Danilo Curti-Feininger, Martin Faass and Sebastian Ehlert. To complement the catalogue there will also be a semi-facsimile complementary publication La ciudad en los confines del mundo [City at the Edge of the World], originally published in 1965 in English and German, with texts by the painter T. Lux Feininger and photographs by Andreas Feininger, two of the artist’s three sons.

 

Andreas Feininger, Nude Study [solarized], 1941  ©  2017 Estate of Andreas Feininger

Andreas Feininger, Nude Study [solarized], 1941 © 2017 Estate of Andreas Feininger

ABOUT LYONEL FEININGER

Feininger was born in New York but his parents, both musicians of German origin, sent him to Hamburg at the age of sixteen to complete his musical training. This dual German-American background would leave a permanent mark on his life and work.

In Germany, Feininger decided to give up music in order to devote himself to his true passion: drawing and illustration. After attending drawing classes at the Algemeine Gewerbeschule [Public School of Arts and Crafts] in Hamburg he focused on the emerging field of comics, in which he would be a pioneering figure. Feininger’s comic strips were soon published, albeit sporadically, in American and German magazines. He became fully established when he signed contracts with the German magazine Ulk in 1895, Lustige Blätter[Funny Pages] the following year, and The Chicago Sunday Tribune in 1906. For the latter Feininger created The Kin-der-Kids and Wee Willie Winkie’s World, his most famous comic strips.
Cover from The Chicago Sunday Tribune with a satyrical image of Lyonel Feininger, 29 de abril de 1906. Colección Achim Moeller, Nueva York

Cover from The Chicago Sunday Tribune with a satyrical image of Lyonel Feininger, 29 de abril de 1906. Colección Achim Moeller, Nueva York

Having made his name as an illustrator, Feininger moved forward creatively with the aim of finding a means of expression that would allow him to fully express his abilities. In a natural, progressive manner he began to move away from comics in favour of painting.

While his earliest works maintain links with comic design, depicting street scenes and exaggerated characters, between 1906 and 1908 and following a period in Paris, he began to make use of a more abstract line, almost completely abandoning figures and adopting a language based on straight lines and fragmented planes of colour.

 

Andreas Feininger (1946) self-portrait  © LIFE

Andreas Feininger (1946) self-portrait © LIFE

Andreas Feininger (1955) The Photojournalist © MoMa /  2017 Estate of Andreas Feininger

Andreas Feininger (1955) The Photojournalist © MoMa / 2017 Estate of Andreas Feininger

 

In 1919 Walter Gropius invited Feininger to join the Bauhaus and direct the printmaking studio, where he taught until the school was closed down by the Nazis in 1932. This experience led him to fully develop his use of the technique of woodcut, allowing him to develop the interaction of spatial planes in his paintings. Following the rise to power of the Nazi regime Feininger’s work was classed as “degenerate”. In 1937 he decided to return to the United States where he spent the rest of his life.

 

News source and text: Fundación Juan March
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“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” by Dominic Perrault Architecture

February 14, 2017

Discover the exhibition on the proposals from the “Île de la Cité” project report by the French architect and former member of the jury for the BigMat International Architecture Award.

 

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

 

What is the future of the Île de la Cité? La Conciergerie will host the panels showing the 35 proposals included in the report made by Philippe Belaval, President of the French National Monuments Center and architect Dominique Perrault, which was handed in to Mr. François Hollande, President of France. The report, named “Mission Île de la Citè”, present s a possible future for the city island by 2040.


 

Practical information

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart”
February 15- April 17, 2017
La Conciergerie
2 Boulevard du Palais, 75001 Paris
France

 


In the heart of the Île de la Cité, the Conciergerie’s Hall of Gens d’Armes welcomes 20 backlit, large-format panels presenting the project, its objectives and its proposals. Between the century-old columns of this magnificent Gothic hall, maps, projections and videos will allow visitors to immerse themselves in what could be the Island of the City by 2040.

 

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

 

Some of the proposals that have been developed and illustrated by the team are the redesign of the central square of Lutèce, the reunification of the Sainte-Chapelle and the Conciergerie in a unique space, a landscaped promenade to the South of the Island, an embankment area serving the square of Notre-Dame de Paris and a series of  covered boardwalks.

 

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

 

A brochure was created specifically for the exhibition in order to accompany the visitor in his discovery of the proposals, allowing him or her to discover more about the contents displayed. “Mission Île de la Cité”, a smartphone app which can be downloaded free of charge, also offers to extend the exhibition’s scope by walking through the Île de la Cité.

Thanks to the creation of virtual models, accessible through 360 ° augmented reality views in a dozen points of the island, the public will be able to imagine themselves on the Island in 2040.

 

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

 

Finally, the public will also have the opportunity to contribute to the reflection on the Future of the Island through an interactive system.

The exhibition “Mission Island of the City, the heart of the heart” will be open to the public, with free admission from February 15 to 19 and March 5. Throughout the duration of the exhibition, until 17 April, the entry fee for the Conciergerie will be free of charge.

 

"Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart" © Dominic Perrault Architecture

“Mission Île de la Cité: the heart of the heart” © Dominic Perrault Architecture

 

Located in the very heart of Paris, the Île de la Cité is one of the most iconic and renowned places of the capital, a showcase of its historic layers built over centuries. Yet its current urban condition could hardly be considered as satisfactory. Limited by poor touristic facilities and pedestrian planning, foreigners often visit Notre Dame in a hurry while Parisians simply prefer to avoid the place. With the upcoming relocation of several major institutions located on the Île de la Cité, namely the Paris Court of Justice and the Police headquarters for which new buildings are under construction in the north of Paris, now is the time to think and imagine better urban qualities for this UNESCO-listed heritage site.

In December 2015, the French President François Hollande decided to address this challenge by entrusting Dominique Perrault, architect and urbanist, along with Philippe Bélaval, President of the French Center for National Monuments, to carry out a prospective study on the future of the Île de la Cité over the next 25 years.

The report was presented by Philippe Bélaval and Dominique Perrault to French President François Hollande, in attendance of French Minister of Home Affairs Bruno Le Roux, French Culture Minister Audrey Azoulay and Mayor of Paris Anne Hidalgo.


 

News source: Mission Île de la Cité
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“Gio Ponti: Infinite Blue” at La Triennale di Milano

February 13, 2017

The exhibition presents Gio Ponti’s original drawings for the Hotel Parco dei Principi, with all his production notes and photographs of the company workshop where the architect worked together with craftsman and workers, as well as a display of the original ceramics in the building.

 

Gio Ponti, Hotel Parco dei Principi, Sorrento 1962 © Marco Zuppetta

Gio Ponti, Hotel Parco dei Principi, Sorrento 1962 © Marco Zuppetta

 

Gio Ponti’s design for the Hotel Parco dei Principi in Sorrento has become part of the history of Italian architecture. The project involved the entire building and, in particular, in collaboration with Ceramica D’Agostino, a series of blue-and-white ceramic decorations transformed a hundred rooms, together with the lobby, the reception area, the bar and the restaurant. The decorations consisted of “mathematical and geometric” combinations of a complete series of 27 patterns which, then as now, were reproduced by hand on 20 x 20 cm maiolica tiles. (more…)